Publications by authors named "Abbas Norouzi"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Does lipoic acid consumption affect the cytokine profile in multiple sclerosis patients: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial.

Neuroimmunomodulation 2014 6;21(6):291-6. Epub 2014 May 6.

Neurosciences Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Background: A limited amount of data exists regarding the effect of lipoic acid (LA), an oral antioxidant supplement, on cytokine profiles among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.

Objective: We aimed to assess the effect of daily consumption of LA on the cytokine profiles in MS patients.

Methods: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, 52 relapsing-remitting MS patients with an age range of 18-50 years were recruited into 2 groups: LA consumption (1,200 mg/day) or placebo. Patients followed their prescribed supplements for 12 weeks. Fasting blood samples for cytokine profile measurement were collected at baseline and after the intervention. Anthropometric parameters were measured based on the standard guidelines.

Results: INF-γ, ICAM-1, TGF-β and IL-4 were significantly reduced in the LA group compared to the placebo group [(INF-γ: 0.82 ± 0.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.2 pg/ml, p < 0.0001), (ICAM-1: 20.2 ± 9.4 vs. 8 ± 10 ng/ml, p = 0.0001), (TGF-β: 103.1 ± 20.2 vs. 54.9 ± 26 ng/ml, p < 0.0001) and (IL-4: 0.1 ± 0.1 vs. 1.02 ± 1.7 ng/ml, p = 0.0112)]. No significant changes in TNF-α, IL-6, EDSS and MMP-9 were found between the LA and placebo groups (p = 0.6, p = 0.8, p = 0.09 and p = 0.8, respectively).

Conclusion: The results suggested that consumption of 1,200 mg LA per day beneficially affects several inflammatory cytokines including INF-γ, ICAM-1 TGF-β and IL-4. Further investigations are needed to verify the beneficial role of LA on other cytokine profiles among MS patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000356145DOI Listing
March 2015

Nitric oxide mediates the beneficial effect of chronic naltrexone on cholestasis-induced memory impairment in male rats.

Behav Pharmacol 2013 Jun;24(3):195-206

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Recent studies suggest an augmentation of endogenous opioids following bile duct ligation (BDL) and their pivotal role in the pathophysiology of cholestasis. In this study, the effect of naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist, was determined on cholestasis-induced memory impairment and the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in this effect. Male Albino-Wistar rats were randomized to sham-operated and BDL-operated groups. In each group, animals were treated for up to 28 days with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg); naltrexone and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nonselective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (3, 10 mg/kg); naltrexone and aminoguanidine, an inducible NOS inhibitor (100 mg/kg); or methylnaltrexone, a peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonist (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Spatial recognition memory was determined in a Y-maze task on the day before surgery and days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after surgery. Memory performance was impaired 14 days after BDL in cholestatic rats and was significantly reversed by chronic treatment with naltrexone at days 14, 21, and 28 after BDL. On day 21 after BDL, chronic L-NAME produced only a nonsignificant decrease in the beneficial effect of naltrexone, whereas on day 28, chronic administration of both L-NAME and aminoguanidine significantly reversed this effect of naltrexone. It is therefore shown in this study that naltrexone improves BDL-induced memory deficit in rats. We conclude that the memory impairment in cholestatic rats might be because of an increase in the level of endogenous opioids and that naltrexone improved the spatial recognition memory by antagonizing opioid receptors. The observation that the procognitive effect of naltrexone is counteracted either by general inhibition of NOS enzymes or by selective inhibition of inducible NOS suggests the nitrergic pathway as a probable mechanism involved in the amelioration of spatial recognition memory by naltrexone in BDL rats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/FBP.0b013e3283618a8cDOI Listing
June 2013

Effect of lipoic acid consumption on oxidative stress among multiple sclerosis patients: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

Nutr Neurosci 2014 Jan 26;17(1):16-20. Epub 2013 Nov 26.

Objectives: Multiple sclerosis is a neurodegenerative and demyelinating disease of central nervous system. High levels of oxidative stress are associated with inflammation and play an important role in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. This double-blind, randomized controlled clinical study was carried out to determine the effect of daily consumption of lipoic acid on oxidative stress among multiple sclerosis patients.

Methods: A total of 52 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, aged 18-50 years with Expanded Disability Status Scale ≤5.5 were assigned to consume either lipoic acid (1200 mg/day) or placebo capsules for 12 weeks. Fasting blood samples were collected before the first dose taken and 12 hours after the last. Dietary intakes were obtained by using 3-day dietary records.

Results: Consumption of lipoic acid resulted in a significant improvement of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in comparison to the placebo group (P = 0.004). Although a significant change of TAC (-1511 mmol/L, P = 0.001) was found within lipoic acid group, other markers of oxidative stress including superoxide dismutase activity, glutathione peroxidase activity, and malondialdehyde levels were not affected by lipoic acid consumption.

Discussion: These results suggest that 1200 mg of lipoic acid improves serum TAC among multiple sclerosis patients but does not affect other markers of oxidative stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/1476830513Y.0000000060DOI Listing
January 2014

Involvement of nitric oxide in pioglitazone memory improvement in morphine-induced memory impaired mice.

Pharmacol Biochem Behav 2012 Dec 27;103(2):313-21. Epub 2012 Aug 27.

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Introduction: Pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist, which is clinically used in treating diabetic patients, has been recently reported to have crucial roles in improving cognition and memory performance. Since the mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective effect of pioglitazone are not entirely understood, the current study was designed to investigate the possible interaction of pioglitazone with morphine in memory-impaired mice and the probable role of nitric oxide (NO) in this effect.

Materials And Methods: All the experiments were performed in passive avoidance and Y-maze paradigms. To induce memory impairment, mice were administered morphine (1, 3 and 10mg/kg, s.c.) immediately before the training trial. Pioglitazone (20, 40 and 80mg/kg, p.o.) was gavaged 2h prior to the training trial. Further, an NO synthase inhibitor, L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p.), or an inducible NO synthase inhibitor, aminoguanidine (100mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 30 min before the training trial to determine the possible involvement of NO in the restorative effect of pioglitazone.

Results: 1) Morphine dose dependently impaired the acquisition of spatial memory and passive avoidance task. 2) Treatment with pioglitazone significantly improved the memory performance in morphine-treated mice in both tests. 3) In the passive avoidance task, L-NAME, but not aminoguanidine, altered the effect of pioglitazone on morphine-induced memory impairment. 4) In Y-maze discrimination, the memory improving effect of pioglitazone was reversed by both NO synthase inhibitors, L-NAME and aminoguanidine.

Discussion: Our results demonstrate that the pioglitazone improving effect on the morphine-induced impairment of memory acquisition is at least in part through the NO pathway. It is suggested that in short term spatial recognition memory, both inducible and constitutive NO synthases are involved, but in the long term fear memory, only the constitutive NO synthases indicated a prominent role in the anti-amnestic effect of pioglitazone on morphine-induced memory impairment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2012.08.018DOI Listing
December 2012

Involvement of NMDA receptors in the beneficial effects of pioglitazone on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

Behav Brain Res 2012 May 14;231(1):138-45. Epub 2012 Mar 14.

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Introduction: Pioglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist, is widely used in clinical medicine as a treatment for type 2 diabetes and is recently proved to have beneficial effects on improving cognition in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, it has been shown that pioglitazone reduces N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA, a glutamate agonist) mediated calcium currents and transients. Since enhanced calcium transients are present in AD models, we tested the hypothesis whether pioglitazone manifests its acquisition memory enhancement role through glutamatergic pathway.

Material And Methods: Memory performance was evaluated in a two-trial recognition Y-maze test and passive avoidance in mice. Pioglitazone (20 or 40 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered 2h before each trial, NMDA (75 mg/kg i.p.), 15 min before pioglitazone, and scopolamine, an M1 (muscarinic) receptor antagonist (0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg i.p.) and MK-801 (dizocilpine) (0.01, 0.03 or 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), the highly selective, non-competitive NMDA antagonist--30 min beforehand.

Results: (1) We induced the memory impairment by scopolamine or MK-801 before trials. (2) Pioglitazone did not improve the memory impairment induced by MK-801. (3) Pioglitazone significantly improved the memory impairment induced by scopolamine. (4) Subeffective dose of MK-801 nullified the beneficial effects of pioglitazone in scopolamine induced memory impaired mice. (5) NMDA promoted the effects of subeffective dose of pioglitazone on memory impaired by scopolamine.

Discussion: In conclusion, the present study suggests that glutamatergic pathway is involved in the pioglitazone induced memory performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2012.03.006DOI Listing
May 2012

Involvement of nitric oxide in granisetron improving effect on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

Brain Res 2012 Jan 9;1429:61-71. Epub 2011 Aug 9.

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Granisetron, a serotonin 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, widely used as an antiemetic drug following chemotherapy, has been found to improve learning and memory. In this study, effects of granisetron on spatial recognition memory and fear memory and the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) have been determined in a Y-maze and passive avoidance test. Granisetron (3, 10mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was administered to scopolamine-induced memory-impaired mice prior to acquisition, consolidation and retrieval phases, either in the presence or in the absence of a non-specific NO synthase inhibitor, l-NAME (3, 10mg/kg, intraperitoneally); a specific inducible NO synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, aminoguanidine (100mg/kg); and a NO precursor, l-arginine (750 mg/kg). It is demonstrated that granisetron improved memory acquisition in a dose-dependent manner, but it was ineffective on consolidation and retrieval phases of memory. The beneficial effect of granisetron (10mg/kg) on memory acquisition was significantly reversed by l-NAME (10mg/kg) and aminoguanidine (100mg/kg); however, l-arginine (750 mg/kg) did not potentiate the effect of sub-effective dose of granisetron (3mg/kg) in memory acquisition phase. It is concluded that nitric oxide is probably involved in improvement of memory acquisition by granisetron in both spatial recognition memory and fear memory. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Cognitive Neuroscience.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2011.08.006DOI Listing
January 2012

Nitric oxide involvement in consolidation, but not retrieval phase of cognitive performance enhanced by atorvastatin in mice.

Eur J Pharmacol 2011 Sep 23;666(1-3):122-30. Epub 2011 May 23.

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Unlabelled: Atorvastatin, a widely-used medication in treatment of hypercholesterolemia, has shown some benefits in treating cognition impairment in Alzheimer's disease. In this study, effects of atorvastatin on spatial recognition memory and the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) has been determined on consolidation and retrieval of memory in a two-trial recognition Y-maze test. Memory was impaired using scopolamine (1mg/kg, i.p.); atorvastatin (1, 5mg/kg, p.o.) was administered, either in presence or in absence of a non-specific NO synthase inhibitor, L-NAME (3, 10mg/kg, i.p.); a specific inducible NO synthase inhibitor, aminoguanidine (100mg/kg, i.p.); and a NO precursor, L-arginine (750 mg/kg, i.p.).

Results: 1) atorvastatin (5mg/kg) significantly improved memory performance in a dose-dependent manner on consolidation and retrieval stage of memory in scopolamine-treated mice; 2) the beneficial effects of atorvastatin on memory consolidation was significantly reversed by L-NAME (10mg/kg) and aminoguanidine; 3) L-arginine slightly potentiated the effects of sub-effective dose of atorvastatin (1mg/kg) on memory consolidation; 4) either L-NAME (up to 10mg/kg), or aminoguanidine did not affect the memory improvement by atorvastatin on retrieval stage; 5) the effects of sub-effective dose of atorvastatin (1mg/kg) on retrieval of memory were not potentiated by L-arginine. The present study demonstrates that atorvastatin improves both consolidation and retrieval phases of memory. This effect is affected by NO synthase inhibitors and NO precursor, L-arginine, only in memory consolidation phase, but not in retrieval phase. It is concluded that NO might be involved in consolidation of spatial memory improvement by atorvastatin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2011.05.017DOI Listing
September 2011

Atorvastatin improved scopolamine-induced impairment in memory acquisition in mice: involvement of nitric oxide.

Brain Res 2011 Apr 23;1386:89-99. Epub 2011 Feb 23.

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Unlabelled: Atorvastatin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, widely used in treatment of hypercholesterolemia, slows the progression of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. In this study, effects of atorvastatin on acquisition of spatial recognition memory and the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) have been determined in a two-trial recognition Y-maze test and passive avoidance. Atorvastatin (1, 5mg/kg, p.o.) was administered prior to acquisition phase, either in presence or in absence of a non-specific NO synthase inhibitor, L-NAME (3, 10mg/kg, i.p.); a specific inducible NO synthase inhibitor, aminoguanidine (100mg/kg); and a NO precursor, l-arginine (750mg/kg).

Results: Atorvastatin significantly improved memory performance in a dose-dependent manner in acquisition of recognition memory, in both Y-maze and passive avoidance tests. 1) Atorvastatin (5mg/kg) significantly increased both exploration time and number of arm entries in scopolamine-treated mice in Y-maze. 2) The beneficial effects of atorvastatin on memory acquisition were significantly reversed by L-NAME (3mg/kg) and aminoguanidine (100mg/kg). 3) The effects of sub-effective dose of atorvastatin (1mg/kg) on memory acquisition were not potentiated by l-arginine (750mg/kg); 4) Administration of atorvastatin (5mg/kg) significantly increased step-through latency in scopolamine-induced memory-impaired mice. 5) Beneficial effect of atorvastatin on passive avoidance was not reversed by L-NAME (up to 10mg/kg). 6) The effects of sub-effective dose of atorvastatin (1mg/kg) on passive avoidance were not potentiated by l-arginine (750mg/kg). The present study demonstrates that atorvastatin improved both short-spatial recognition memory and fear memory. As this effect is reversed by L-NAME and aminoguanidine in short-term memory acquisition, it is concluded that NO might be involved in spatial memory improvement by atorvastatin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2011.02.057DOI Listing
April 2011

Suppression of nitric oxide synthesis by L-NAME reverses the beneficial effects of pioglitazone on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

Eur J Pharmacol 2011 Jan 14;650(1):240-8. Epub 2010 Oct 14.

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Unlabelled: Pioglitazone, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), which is widely used in treatment of type 2 diabetes, has shown some therapeutic effect in Alzheimer's disease. In this study, effects of acute pioglitazone on acquisition, consolidation and retrieval of memory, and also the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the effects of pioglitazone on spatial recognition memory has been investigated in a two-trial recognition Y-maze test and passive avoidance in mice. Memory impairment was induced by scopolamine (1mg/kg, i.p.). Pioglitazone (10 and 20mg/kg, p.o.) was administrated prior to either acquisition, consolidation or retention trials, while L-NAME (N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester), a non-specific NO synthase inhibitor, was administered (10mg/kg, i.p.) 30min before each trial.

Results: 1) pioglitazone improved the acquisition of recognition spatial memory-impaired by scopolamine; L-NAME dramatically reversed improving effects of pioglitazone on memory acquisition; 2) pioglitazone did not change the consolidation of spatial memory, impaired by scopolamine; 3) pioglitazone improved the retrieval of spatial memory and L-NAME did not alter the beneficial effect of pioglitazone; 4) pioglitazone did not affect scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in the passive avoidance test. The present study demonstrates the beneficial effect of acute pioglitazone administration on acquisition and retrieval of scopolamine-induced cognitive deficits. This effect was reversed only in acquisition phase by nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NAME, therefore, it could be concluded that NO might be involved in the pioglitazone beneficial effect of spatial memory acquisition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2010.10.007DOI Listing
January 2011

Involvement of the nitric oxide pathway in the anticonvulsant effect of tramadol on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in mice.

Epilepsy Behav 2010 Nov 28;19(3):290-5. Epub 2010 Sep 28.

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

In the present study, the effects of tramadol on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and involvement of nitric oxide (NO) were assessed in mice. To determine the threshold for clonic seizures, PTZ was administered intravenously. Tramadol was administered intraperitoneally (0.5-50mg/kg) 30 minutes prior to induction of seizures. The effects of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 0.5, 1, 5, and 10mg/kg), the nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg), and the nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5mg/kg) on the anticonvulsant effect of tramadol were investigated. Administration of tramadol (1mg/kg) increased the threshold for seizures induced with PTZ in a monophasic, dose-independent, and time-dependent manner. Acute administration of L-NAME (5 and 10mg/kg) inhibited the anticonvulsant effect of tramadol (1mg/kg), whereas L-arginine, in the noneffective dose range (30 and 60 mg/kg), potentiated the seizure threshold when co-administered with a subeffective dose of tramadol (0.5mg/kg). Naloxone partially and dose-independently antagonized the anticonvulsant effect of tramadol (1mg/kg). These results indicate that the anticonvulsant effect of tramadol is mediated by the nitric oxide pathway and also by classic opioid receptors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2010.08.006DOI Listing
November 2010

Tocolytic effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in mice model of lipopolysaccharide--induced preterm delivery: role of nitric oxide.

Reprod Sci 2010 Apr;17(4):391-400

Basic Medical Sciences Research Center, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran.

Introduction: In this study, we explained that exogenous cannabinoid, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has a preventive effect in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced preterm delivery and the contribution of nitric oxide (NO) pathway as a mechanism involved in this process.

Study Design: Preterm delivery was induced by double dose of 35 microg/kg LPS with 3-hour interval on gestational day (gd) 15. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol was administered with (a) double dose (0.02, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 mg/kg) 1 hour before each LPS injection, on gd 15 and (b) single administration (0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 mg/kg,) on gds 13 and 14, and the double administration, 1 hour before each LPS injection. To assess the involved mechanism, either AM281 (CB1 receptor antagonist, 2 mg/kg) and AM630 (CB2 receptor antagonist, 5 mg/kg) or N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 2 mg/kg) was administered 1 hour before each THC injection on gds 13, 14, and 15. The main outcome measurement was the incidence of preterm delivery after injection of last LPS dose. Any interaction in the incidence and time of preterm delivery was ruled out by administration of AM281, AM630, or L-NAME alone.

Results: Chronic THC treatment (0.5 mg/kg) significantly decreased the incidence of LPS-induced premature labor and increased the delivery time. Both AM281 and L-NAME reversed THC-induced attenuation of preterm delivery rate and pregnancy duration. Unlike AM281, AM630 did not influence the rate of preterm delivery in THC-treated mice.

Conclusion: Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol contributes to the regulation of gestational duration in LPS-induced preterm delivery probably by NO coupling through the CB1 receptor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1933719109358456DOI Listing
April 2010

Evaluation of the tocolytic effect of morphine in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm delivery: the role of nitric oxide.

Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2009 Dec 9;147(2):166-72. Epub 2009 Sep 9.

Brain and Spinal Injury Repair Research Center, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran.

Objectives: This study evaluated the preventive effect of morphine on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced preterm delivery and the contribution of the nitric oxide pathway as a mechanism involved in this process.

Study Design: Pregnant mice were treated with LPS: (a) single doses of 35, 50 and 75 microg/kg; (b) double doses of 25, 35 and 50 microg/kg with a 3-h interval, on gestational day 15. Each treatment group consisted of 5-10 mice and the main outcome measurements were the incidence and gestational duration after injection of the last LPS dose. Administration of LPS (35 microg/kg, with a 3-h interval) induced the highest incidence of preterm delivery in mice. For investigation of morphine effects on preterm delivery, animals were treated either with a single dose (10 or 20 mg/kg), or with double doses (5 or 10 mg/kg; with a 3-h interval) of morphine, 1h before each LPS injection. To assess the involved mechanism, either naltrexone (5 and 10 mg/kg) or N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 2-10 mg/kg) was administered 1h before the first morphine administration. Any interaction in the incidence and/or time of preterm delivery was ruled out by other groups which received naltrexone or l-NAME, each alone. Data were analyzed by the Fisher's exact test for determination of preterm delivery incidences and by the one-way analysis of variance, followed by post-test Tukey, for determination of gestational duration.

Results: Although LPS induced premature labor and decreased the delivery time to gestational day 16, morphine treatment significantly decreased the incidence of LPS-induced premature labor by 50% and increased the delivery time to gestational day 17.6. Naltrexone (5 mg/kg) did not influence morphine-induced attenuation of preterm delivery rate and pregnancy duration. Unlike naltrexone, l-NAME (2 mg/kg) increased the rate of preterm delivery to 100% and decreased pregnancy duration to gestational day 16 in morphine-treated mice. In fact, l-NAME significantly attenuated morphine's preventive effect on preterm delivery.

Conclusion: Morphine increases the gestational duration and decreases the preterm delivery rate induced by LPS probably through modulation in NO release. l-NAME, unlike naltrexone, reversed the effect of morphine on preterm delivery, demonstrating the involvement of nitric oxidergic pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejogrb.2009.08.014DOI Listing
December 2009