Publications by authors named "Abbas A Dib"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Breakage of sliding hip screw after fixation of pertrochanteric hip fracture: A rare complication.

Int J Surg Case Rep 2021 Jul 22;85:106226. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Lebanese University, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Beirut, Lebanon.

Introduction: The authors report a rare case of lag screw breakage in a patient treated using locking DHS with home-made trochanteric stabilizing plate (TSP) for pertrochanteric hip fracture.

Case Presentation: A 67 year-old female was operated for pertrochanteric hip fracture with incompetent lateral wall using locking DHS with home-made TSP. At seven months postoperative, there was radiographic nonunion with breakage of the sliding lag screw. Patient was consequently scheduled for total hip replacement.

Discussion: Breakage of DHS lag screw has been attributed to multiple-cycle, low-stress fatigue failure associated with nonunion. Predisposing factors are: situation of the medial edge of the barrel at the level of the fracture site prohibiting fracture compression, and mechanical obstacle to the lag screw back sliding into the barrel. In our case, the use of handmade TSP interdicted lag screw back sliding and prevented fracture impaction which was already impaired by the location of the medial edge of the barrel at the fracture level. Additionally our fixation construct was very rigid because of the use of locking screws in the DHS side plate.

Conclusion: When DHS fixation is planned for unstable or potentially unstable trochanteric hip fracture the surgeon should be prepared by making available a TSP from the manufacturer in the operative room rather than improvising intra-operatively with handmade TSP; this augmentation device shouldn't interfere with lag screw back sliding. Furthermore the DHS barrel should ideally not impinge with the fracture site, and the use of locking screws in the DHS plate should be cautious.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijscr.2021.106226DOI Listing
July 2021

The instep flap for anterior ankle coverage with bone and hardware exposure.

Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol 2021 Jun 12. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Division of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Sahel General Hospital, University Medical Centre, PO Box 99/25., Ghoubeiry, Beirut, Lebanon.

Purpose: The instep medial plantar flap is a well-known flap based on the medial plantar artery of the foot and usually used for coverage of soft tissue defects of the heel area. It has seldom been reported for coverage of anterior ankle area with exposure of the bone and metallic hardware after open reduction and internal fixation of distal tibial fractures. The primary purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and viability of this flap as well as its reliability saving the internal fixation devices and efficiency protecting bone healing; the secondary purpose is to assess the condition of the flap and its cosmetic appearance, as well as occurrence of complications related to its harvesting.

Material And Methods: This is a retrospective review of medical records of patients operated from December 2015 to December 2020 with application of an instep flap for coverage of the anterior ankle area with exposure of the bone and metallic hardware secondary to open reduction and internal fixation of distal tibial fractures. All patients were reviewed for the purpose of this study; they were assessed for the viability and functional and sensory condition of the flap, signs of local infection, as well as for residual pain and sensory impairment of the toes; subjective cosmetic appearance of the flap was also judged.

Results: There were four patients with 32 years mean age and 35 months mean follow-up. The mean flap size was 7.75 cm × 5.75 cm. At final follow-up, all fractures were completely consolidated, and all flaps were living, stable, and sensitive. No distal sensation disturbance was noticed, and none of the patients had pain or annoyance caused by the flap or presented signs of infection. Only one patient expressed mild aesthetic complain.

Conclusion: The fascio-cutaneous instep medial plantar flap is a reliable solution to cover the anterior ankle area with exposure of the bone and metallic hardware after open reduction and internal fixation of distal tibial fractures, especially for defects measuring up to 9 cm × 6 cm. This flap is technically valid and reproducible; it offers good quality of soft tissue coverage with satisfactory cosmetic appearance and minimal morbidity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00590-021-03055-4DOI Listing
June 2021

The adjunct use of lateral hinged external fixator in the treatment of traumatic destabilizing elbow injuries.

Int Orthop 2021 05 23;45(5):1299-1308. Epub 2021 Feb 23.

Division of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Sahel General Hospital, University Medical Centre, PO Box 99/25, Ghoubeiry, Beirut, Lebanon.

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of using a lateral hinged external fixator as an adjunct stabilizer in the treatment of a variety of acute destabilizing elbow injuries.

Methods: A retrospective review was performed on the medical records of patients in whom a lateral monolateral elbow hinged external fixator was applied by the senior author. The indication to apply the fixator corresponded to a variety of acute injury patterns ranging from simple elbow trauma or dislocation to complex fracture-dislocation, and the decision was based on either the presence of recurrent or persistent instability in any direction and/or to secure a vulnerable or weak bony fixation or soft tissue repair as intra-operatively judged by the surgeon. The fixator was inserted in the same setting after the repair of the associated ligamentous and/or bony structures. Patients operated after one month of the trauma and those presented with open elbow injury or associated humeral or ulnar shaft fracture were excluded. Rehabilitation was immediately started and the fixator removed at six to eight weeks with elbow testing and gentle manipulation under general anaesthesia, and resuming of rehabilitation after removal. Clinical assessment was performed for all patients according to the Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) with evaluation of range of motion at regular intervals till the end of the post-operative first year, then at final follow-up for the purpose of the study with radiographic assessment for evaluation of elbow reduction and concentricity.

Results: There were 13 patients with a mean age of 42 years. Two patients had instability secondary to LCL rupture; one patient had redislocation because of associated coronoid process fracture; one patient had radial head fracture with rupture of both collateral ligaments; five patients had terrible triad injury with variable association of collateral ligaments lesions; and four patients had posterior Monteggia fracture-dislocation. The mean MEPS was 90 at a mean follow-up of seven years with six excellent, six good, and one fair result. All patients had a concentrically reduced and stable elbow as assessed clinically and radiologically with a mean functional arc of motion of 132° for extension-flexion and 178° for pronation-supination.

Conclusion: The hinged elbow external fixator represents a valuable adjunct in the therapeutic arsenal for the treatment of unstable elbows after bony and soft tissue repair. It provides satisfactory results in terms of stability and function and should be available in the operating room when a surgeon treats a complex elbow dislocation or fracture-dislocation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00264-021-04985-8DOI Listing
May 2021
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