Dr. Aaron Barnes, MD, PhD - University of Minnesota Medical School - Resident (Laboratory Medicine / Clinical Pathology)

Dr. Aaron Barnes

MD, PhD

University of Minnesota Medical School

Resident (Laboratory Medicine / Clinical Pathology)

Minneapolis, MN | United States

Dr. Aaron Barnes, MD, PhD - University of Minnesota Medical School - Resident (Laboratory Medicine / Clinical Pathology)

Dr. Aaron Barnes

MD, PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: University of Minnesota Medical School - Minneapolis, MN , United States


View Dr. Aaron Barnes’s Resume / CV

Metrics

Number of Publications

12

Publications

Number of Profile Views

103

Profile Views

Number of Article Reads

29

Reads

Number of Citations

150

Citations

Education

May 2014
University of Minnesota Medical School
M.D.
Oct 2012
University of Minnesota Medical School
Ph.D.

Top co-authors

Gary M Dunny
Gary M Dunny

University of Minnesota

10
Carol L Wells
Carol L Wells

University of Minnesota

5
Dawn A Manias
Dawn A Manias

University of Minnesota

3
Kristi L Frank
Kristi L Frank

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine

3
Patrick M Schlievert
Patrick M Schlievert

University of Minnesota Medical School

3
Donavon J Hess
Donavon J Hess

University of Minnesota

3
Robin Patel
Robin Patel

Mayo Clinic

2

Publications

12Publications

29Reads

150PubMed Central Citations

Widespread Lichtheimia Infection in a Patient with Extensive Burns: Opportunities for Novel Antifungal Agents.

Mycopathologia 2018 Jul 2. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Department of Medicine (Division of Infectious Diseases and International Medicine), University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.

View Article
July 2018
1.530 Impact Factor

Enterococcus faecalis readily colonizes the entire gastrointestinal tract and forms biofilms in a germ-free mouse model.

Virulence 2017 04 25;8(3):282-296. Epub 2016 Aug 25.

a Departments of Microbiology & Immunology , University of Minnesota Medical School , Minneapolis , MN , USA.

View Article
April 2017
5 Reads
2 Citations
4.220 Impact Factor

Evaluation of the Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm-Associated Virulence Factors AhrC and Eep in Rat Foreign Body Osteomyelitis and In Vitro Biofilm-Associated Antimicrobial Resistance.

PLoS One 2015 15;10(6):e0130187. Epub 2015 Jun 15.

Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States of America; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States of America.

View Article
April 2016
12 Reads
6 Citations
3.230 Impact Factor

Multiple roles for Enterococcus faecalis glycosyltransferases in biofilm-associated antibiotic resistance, cell envelope integrity, and conjugative transfer.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2015 Jul 27;59(7):4094-105. Epub 2015 Apr 27.

Department of Microbiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

View Article
July 2015
1 Read
12 Citations
4.480 Impact Factor

AhrC and Eep are biofilm infection-associated virulence factors in Enterococcus faecalis.

Infect Immun 2013 May 4;81(5):1696-708. Epub 2013 Mar 4.

Department of Microbiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

View Article
May 2013
1 Read
14 Citations
3.730 Impact Factor

Ultrastructure of a novel bacterial form located in Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in vivo catheter-associated biofilms.

J Histochem Cytochem 2012 Oct 21;60(10):770-6. Epub 2012 Jul 21.

Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

View Article
October 2012
3 Citations
1.960 Impact Factor

Enterococcus faecalis produces abundant extracellular structures containing DNA in the absence of cell lysis during early biofilm formation.

MBio 2012 24;3(4):e00193-12. Epub 2012 Jul 24.

Department of Microbiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

View Article
October 2012
1 Read
39 Citations
6.790 Impact Factor

Use of recombinase-based in vivo expression technology to characterize Enterococcus faecalis gene expression during infection identifies in vivo-expressed antisense RNAs and implicates the protease Eep in pathogenesis.

Infect Immun 2012 Feb 5;80(2):539-49. Epub 2011 Dec 5.

Department of Microbiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

View Article
February 2012
21 Citations
3.730 Impact Factor

Relation between antibiotic susceptibility and ultrastructure of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms on surgical suture.

Surg Infect (Larchmt) 2011 Aug;12(4):297-305

Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455, USA.

View Article
August 2011
6 Reads
7 Citations
1.720 Impact Factor

Bacterial contamination of surgical suture resembles a biofilm.

Surg Infect (Larchmt) 2010 Oct;11(5):433-9

Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota , Minneapolis, MN, USA.

View Article
October 2010
2 Reads
14 Citations
1.720 Impact Factor

Development and use of an efficient system for random mariner transposon mutagenesis to identify novel genetic determinants of biofilm formation in the core Enterococcus faecalis genome.

Appl Environ Microbiol 2008 Jun 11;74(11):3377-86. Epub 2008 Apr 11.

Department of Microbiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA.

View Article
June 2008
1 Read
32 Citations
3.670 Impact Factor

Conformational Behavior of Guest Chains in Uniaxially Stretched Poly(diethylsiloxane) Elastomers:  2H NMR and SANS

Macromolecules. 2003 36(25):9458.

Macromolecules

2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) data are reported for deuterated guest chains of polydiethysiloxane (PDES) in end-linked PDES networks as a function of the molecular weight of guest chains relative to that of the network elastic chains. We exploit the ability of PDES networks to form a strain-induced mesophase to demonstrate the tendency of longer guest chains to phase separate or partition selectively to the amorphous phase and the tendency of smaller guest chains to remain distributed between the mesophase and the amorphous phase. The segmental orientation of the guest chains measured via 2H NMR peak splitting can be interpreted in terms of an enthalpic orientational coupling of the chain segments in the amorphous state. SANS results show that the radius of gyration of guest chains in the unstretched networks and in the networks stretched below the mesomorphic transition remains essentially unchanged from that in the melt state. The scattering intensity from SANS patterns for networks with guest chains of any size has a peak in the direction parallel to the stretch direction that reflects the domain spacing of the lamellae in the mesophase.

View Article
December 2003
1 Read

Top co-authors

Gary M Dunny
Gary M Dunny

University of Minnesota

10
Carol L Wells
Carol L Wells

University of Minnesota

5
Dawn A Manias
Dawn A Manias

University of Minnesota

3
Kristi L Frank
Kristi L Frank

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine

3
Patrick M Schlievert
Patrick M Schlievert

University of Minnesota Medical School

3
Donavon J Hess
Donavon J Hess

University of Minnesota

3
Robin Patel
Robin Patel

Mayo Clinic

2