Publications by authors named "A William Barrett"

2,150 Publications

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Caring for carers: Understanding the physical and psychological well-being of carers of veterans in Australia.

Health Soc Care Community 2021 May 28. Epub 2021 May 28.

Allied Health and Human Performance, Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition, and Activity (ARENA), University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Carers of veterans tend to put their own physical and psychological well-being needs behind the needs of the person they are caring for and often do not seek assistance for their own physical and psychological well-being. Combined, these factors lead to increased risk of acute and chronic illness and mental health issues. It is acknowledged that physical activity independently contributes to improved physical and mental health and may be a driver for mental well-being in carers. The aim of this pilot research was to understand how movement behaviour and health behaviours of carers of veterans in Australia relate to carers' physical and psychological well-being. Assessment occurred between February and July 2019 and included objective, validated measures to examine physical and psychological well-being. To assess the association between physical and psychological factors, correlational analyses were performed. Twenty-eight carers participated in the pilot study (96% female, mean age 61.6 years). Exercise capacity varied, and 84% of carers met the recommended 150 min of physical activity per week, with carers spending 8.6% of their time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity; and 37.9% of the day sedentary. Psychological health outcomes reflect a population with high distress levels and lower than average mental well-being, but with normal resilience scores. Carers with higher levels of resilience had greater exercise capacity, covering further distance in the 6-min walk test, and as resilience increased, number of sedentary bouts decreased. This research demonstrates that there is a relationship between health behaviours and psychological well-being in carers of veterans and serving personnel. Based on the findings of this pilot study, programmes to support family carers should include information about physical activity, reducing sedentary time, and increasing resilience. Interventions designed to improve physical and psychological well-being should be trialled and evaluated for effectiveness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hsc.13449DOI Listing
May 2021

AZD1222 vaccine-related coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia without thrombosis in a young female.

Br J Haematol 2021 May 25. Epub 2021 May 25.

Department of Haematology, Tallaght University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.17530DOI Listing
May 2021

What is your story?

Clin Teach 2021 Jun;18(3):205

Editor-in-Chief, The Clinical Teacher, Waterford, Ireland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tct.13363DOI Listing
June 2021

Accuracy of the "Thumb-Palm Test" for Detection of Ascending Aortic Aneurysm.

Am J Cardiol 2021 Jul 18;150:114-116. Epub 2021 May 18.

Aortic Institute at Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. Electronic address:

We have noticed, in caring for thousands of patients with ascending aortic aneurysm (AscAA), that the "thumb palm test" is often positive (with the thumb crossing beyond the edge of the palm). It is not known how accurate this test may be. We conducted the thumb-palm test in 305 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with intra-operative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) for a variety of disorders: ascending aneurysm in 59 (19.4%) and non-AscAA disease in 246 (80.6%) (including CABG, valve repair, and descending aortic aneurysm). The TEE provided a precise ascending aortic diameter. The thumb palm test gave us a discrete, binary positive or negative result. We calculated the accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of the thumb palm test in determining presence or absence of AscAA (defined as ascending aortic diameter > 3.8cm). Maximal ascending aortic diameters ranged from 2.0 to 6.6 cm (mean 3.48). 93 patients (30.6%) were classified as having an AscAA and 212 (69.4%) as not having an AscAA. 10 patients (3.3%) had a positive thumb-palm test and 295 patients (96.7%) did not. Sensitivity of the test (proportion of diseased patients correctly classified) was low (7.5%), but specificity (proportion of non-diseased patients correctly classified) was very high (98.5%). This study supports the utility of the thumb-palm test in evaluation for ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm. That is to say, a positive test implies a substantial likelihood of harboring an ascending aortic aneurysm. A negative test does not exclude an aneurysm. In other words, the majority of aneurysm patients do not manifest a positive thumb-palm sign, but patients who do have a positive sign have a very high likelihood of harboring an ascending aneurysm. We suggest that the thumb-palm test be part of the standard physical examination, especially in patients with suspicion of ascending aortic aneurysm (e.g. those with a positive family history).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2021.03.041DOI Listing
July 2021

T2*-weighted MRI produces viable fetal "Black-Bone" contrast with significant benefits when compared to current sequences.

Br J Radiol 2021 May 21:20200940. Epub 2021 May 21.

Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK.

Objectives: Fetal "black bone" MRI could be useful in the diagnosis of various skeletal conditions during pregnancy without exposure to ionizing radiation. Previously suggested susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is not available in the suggested form on all scanners leading to long imaging times that are susceptible to motion artefacts. We aimed to assess if an optimized T2*-weighted GRE sequence can provide viable "black bone" contrast and compared it to other sequences in the literature.

Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 17 patients who underwent fetal MRI. Patients were imaged with an optimized T2*-weighted GRE sequence, as well as at least one other "black-bone" sequence. Image quality was scored by four blinded observers on a five-point scale.

Results: The T2*-weighted GRE sequence offered adequate to excellent image quality in 63% of cases and scored consistently higher than the three other comparison sequences when comparing images from the same patient. Image quality was found to be dependent on gestational age with good image quality achieved on almost all patients after 26 weeks.

Conclusions: T2*-weighted GRE imaging can provide adequate fetal "black bone" contrast and performs at least as well as other sequences in the literature due to good bone to soft tissue contrast and minimal motion artefacts.

Advances In Knowledge: T2*-weighted fetal "black-bone" imaging can provide excellent bone to soft tissue contrast without using ionizing radiation. It is as good as other "black bone" sequences and may be simpler and more widely implemented, with less motion artefacts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1259/bjr.20200940DOI Listing
May 2021