Publications by authors named "A V Salisbury"

192 Publications

An E-Textile Respiration Sensing System for NICU Monitoring: Design and Validation.

J Signal Process Syst 2021 Jul 17:1-15. Epub 2021 Jul 17.

Department of Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI USA.

The world is witnessing a rising number of preterm infants who are at significant risk of medical conditions. These infants require continuous care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). Medical parameters are continuously monitored in premature infants in the NICU using a set of wired, sticky electrodes attached to the body. Medical adhesives used on the electrodes can be harmful to the baby, causing skin injuries, discomfort, and irritation. In addition, respiration rate (RR) monitoring in the NICU faces challenges of accuracy and clinical quality because RR is extracted from electrocardiogram (ECG). This research paper presents a design and validation of a smart textile pressure sensor system that addresses the existing challenges of medical monitoring in NICU. We designed two e-textile, piezoresistive pressure sensors made of Velostat for noninvasive RR monitoring; one was hand-stitched on a mattress topper material, and the other was embroidered on a denim fabric using an industrial embroidery machine. We developed a data acquisition system for validation experiments conducted on a high-fidelity, programmable NICU baby mannequin. We designed a signal processing pipeline to convert raw time-series signals into parameters including RR, rise and fall time, and comparison metrics. The results of the experiments showed that the relative accuracies of hand-stitched sensors were 98.68 (top sensor) and 98.07 (bottom sensor), while the accuracies of embroidered sensors were 99.37 (left sensor) and 99.39 (right sensor) for the 60 BrPM test case. The presented prototype system shows promising results and demands more research on textile design, human factors, and human experimentation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11265-021-01669-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8286045PMC
July 2021

Pediatric Oncologists' Experiences Returning and Incorporating Genomic Sequencing Results into Cancer Care.

J Pers Med 2021 Jun 18;11(6). Epub 2021 Jun 18.

Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Pediatric oncologists' perspectives around returning and incorporating tumor and germline genomic sequencing (GS) results into cancer care are not well-described. To inform optimization of cancer genomics communication, we assessed oncologists' experiences with return of genomic results (ROR), including their preparation/readiness for ROR, collaboration with genetic counselors (GCs) during ROR, and perceived challenges. The BASIC3 study paired pediatric oncologists with GCs to return results to patients' families. We thematically analyzed 24 interviews with 12 oncologists at two post-ROR time points. Oncologists found pre-ROR meetings with GCs and geneticists essential to interpreting patients' reports and communicating results to families. Most oncologists took a collaborative ROR approach where they discussed tumor findings and GCs discussed germline findings. Oncologists perceived many roles for GCs during ROR, including answering families' questions and describing information in lay language. Challenges identified included conveying uncertain information in accessible language, limits of oncologists' genetics expertise, and navigating families' emotional responses. Oncologists emphasized how GCs' and geneticists' support was essential to ROR, especially for germline findings. GS can be successfully integrated into cancer care, but to account for the GC shortage, alternative ROR models and access to genetics resources will be needed to better support families and avoid burdening oncologists.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jpm11060570DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8235493PMC
June 2021

Antibiofilm Efficacy of Polihexanide, Octenidine and Sodium Hypochlorite/Hypochlorous Acid Based Wound Irrigation Solutions against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a Multispecies Biofilm.

Adv Exp Med Biol 2021 Jun 26. Epub 2021 Jun 26.

5D Health Protection Group Ltd, Centre of Excellence in Biofilm Science (CEBS), Liverpool, UK.

Infection and the formation of biofilms have been shown to have a significant role in increased inflammation and delayed wound healing. Wound irrigation solutions are used to debride wounds, removing cell debris and infecting microorganisms, therefore preventing infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate a Polihexanide (PHMB) based wound irrigation solution, Octenidine HCl based wound irrigation solution and electrolysed water based wound care solution for antibiofilm efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a multispecies biofilm in several models to gain a broad understanding of ability. The PHMB based wound irrigation solution demonstrated broad range antibiofilm efficacy against P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and the multispecies biofilm. The Octenidine HCl based wound irrigation solution and the electrolysed water based wound care solution demonstrated potent antibiofilm efficacy against S. aureus and to a lesser extent P. aeruginosa. Overall, less efficacy was observed in the drip flow bioreactor model for all 3 test solutions, which may be attributed to the continuous flow of nutrients during treatment, which may have diluted or washed away the solution. The data presented also highlights the importance of testing antibiofilm activity in a range of biofilm models and against different bacterial strains to get an overall representation of efficacy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/5584_2021_645DOI Listing
June 2021

Rational design, synthesis and testing of novel tricyclic topoisomerase inhibitors for the treatment of bacterial infections part 2.

RSC Med Chem 2020 Dec 18;11(12):1379-1385. Epub 2020 Sep 18.

Redx Anti-Infectives Ltd Alderley Park Macclesfield SK10 4TG Cheshire UK.

Building on our previously-reported novel tricyclic topoisomerase inhibitors (NTTIs), we disclose the discovery of REDX07965, which has an MIC of 0.5 μg mL against , favourable pharmacokinetic properties, selectivity human topoisomerase II and an acceptable toxicity profile. The results herein validate a rational design approach to address the urgent unmet medical need for novel antibiotics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d0md00175aDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8126889PMC
December 2020

Rational design, synthesis and testing of novel tricyclic topoisomerase inhibitors for the treatment of bacterial infections part 1.

RSC Med Chem 2020 Dec 18;11(12):1366-1378. Epub 2020 Sep 18.

Redx Anti-Infectives Ltd, Alderley Park, Mereside Macclesfield SK10 4TG UK.

The alarming reduction in drug effectiveness against bacterial infections has created an urgent need for the development of new antibacterial agents that circumvent bacterial resistance mechanisms. We report here a series of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors that demonstrate potent activity against a range of Gram-positive and selected Gram-negative organisms, including clinically-relevant and drug-resistant strains. In part 1, we present a detailed structure activity relationship (SAR) analysis that led to the discovery of our previously disclosed compound, REDX05931, which has a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.06 μg mL against fluoroquinolone-resistant . Although hERG and CYP inhibition precluded further development, it validates a rational design approach to address this urgent unmet medical need and provides a scaffold for further optimisation, which is presented in part 2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d0md00174kDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8126884PMC
December 2020
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