Publications by authors named "A Tórz"

11 Publications

Effects of steaming on health-valuable nutrients from fortified farmed fish: Gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) as case studies.

Food Chem Toxicol 2021 Apr 18;152:112218. Epub 2021 Apr 18.

Aquaculture, Valorization and Bioprospection Division (DivAV), Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere, I.P. (IPMA), Lisbon, Portugal; Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR), University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.

Fish fortification with iodine-rich macroalgae (Laminaria digitata) and Selenium-rich yeast is expected to promote nutritional added value of this crucial food item, contributing to a healthy and balanced diet for consumers. However, it is not known if steaming can affect these nutrient levels in fortified fish. The present study evaluates the effect of steaming on nutrients contents in fortified farmed gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Fortified seabream presented enhanced I, Se and Fe contents, whereas fortified carp presented enhanced I, Se and Zn contents. Steaming resulted in increased I and Se contents in fortified seabream, and increased Fe and Zn levels in fortified carp, with higher elements true retention values (TRVs >90%). The consumption of 150 g of steamed fortified seabream contributes to a significant daily intake (DI) of I (up to 12%) and Se (up to >100%). On the other hand, steamed fortified carp contributes to 19-23% of I DI and 30%-71% of Se DI. These results demonstrate that steaming is a healthy cooking method, maintaining the enhanced nutritional quality of fortified fish. Moreover, the present fortification strategy is a promising solution to develop high-quality farmed fish products to overcome nutritional deficiencies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2021.112218DOI Listing
April 2021

Nutritional value and sensory properties of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) fillets enriched with sustainable and natural feed ingredients.

Food Chem Toxicol 2021 Apr 14;152:112197. Epub 2021 Apr 14.

Division of Aquaculture, Seafood Upgrading and Bioprospection, Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere (IPMA), Lisboa, Portugal.

Declines across global fishery stocks forced aquaculture feed manufacturers to search for new and sustainable components. Therefore, the aim of study was assessing nutritional value and sensory properties of meat of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) fed for 116 days with two blends. The control feed contained 5% of fishmeal and vegetable oils (rapeseed and soybean) as sole fat sources. While in the experimental diet half of the fishmeal was replaced with a blend of microalgae (Spirulina sp., Chlorella sp.), macroalgae (Laminaria digitata) and vegetable oil was replaced with salmon oil. Proximate composition, energy value, fatty acid profile of meat, nutritional characteristics of fat and protein as well as culinary properties of fillets were assessed. Fillets of carp fed experimental diet had a higher level of protein, lower level of fat and energy value. Intramuscular fat of fish fed with the experimental diet had a better parameters of quality. Protein in the meat of fish from both groups was characterized by a high quality comparing to the protein standard. Our study showed that meat of carp fed with experimental feed enriched with sustainable and natural feed ingredients can be a sensorily attractive source of nutritious ingredients in the human diet.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2021.112197DOI Listing
April 2021

Structural and molecular indices in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) fed n-3 PUFA enriched diet.

Food Chem Toxicol 2021 May 23;151:112146. Epub 2021 Mar 23.

Sparos Lda, Área Empresarial de Marim, Lote C, 8700-221, Olhão, Portugal.

Sustainable freshwater aquaculture has been recently gaining attention owing to the potential of nourishing the world. The study aimed to evaluate the influence of finishing diets on the activity of 21 genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism and intestinal homeostasis, liver and intestine histology, and the level of eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids in common carp fillets. We compared two experimental diets: control diet mimicking a commercial feed (CTRL) and a test diet (CB) fortified with EPA and DHA retrieved from salmon by-products. An additional control (eCTRL) from extensively cultured carps was investigated. The study revealed that the expression of seven hepatic genes, e.g., lipoprotein lipase and fatty acid synthase, and six intestinal genes e.g., claudin-3c and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, was influenced specifically by the experimental diets and farming type. Fish from the eCTRL group had the smallest hepatocytes and the largest nuclei compared with CTRL and CB. No pathological signs were found in intestine samples. Additionally, the levels of EPA and DHA in fillets were significantly higher in fish receiving CB compared with CTRL and eCTRL. The use of fortified diets is a promising solution to produce freshwater species with enhanced nutritional value without compromising the safety of fillets.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2021.112146DOI Listing
May 2021

A comparison of the concentrations of heavy metals in modern and medieval shells of swollen river mussels (Unio tumidus) from the Szczecin Lagoon, SW Baltic basin.

Mar Pollut Bull 2021 Feb 12;163:111959. Epub 2021 Jan 12.

West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Faculty of Food Sciences and Fisheries, Kazimierza Królewicza Street 4, 71-550 Szczecin, Poland. Electronic address:

The shells of mussels, live-collected bivalves or during archaeological excavations, can be used as bioindicators of current and historical levels of heavy metal contamination. In this study, we examined the shells of Unio tumidus, commonly found in the Baltic Sea region, and determined the concentrations of Zn, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni, and Cd in samples from the 10th, 11th, and 21st century from the area of the Szczecin Lagoon. The average levels of heavy metals (in μg g dry weight) in the shells from the Middle Ages were: 137.5 (Fe), 3.87 (Zn), 0.789 (Cu), 0.012 (Pb), 0.047 (Ni), and 0.0009 (Cd). Shells from the 21st century were significantly (P<0.05) more abundant in Fe, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Cd (rates of increase: 1.96×, 3.54×, 2.71×, 2.08×, and 3.55×, respectively) than shells from the Middle Ages. These results reflect contemporary anthropogenic pollution of the environment with heavy metals and confirm the possibility of using U. tumidus shells in the assessment of heavy metal pollution levels.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2020.111959DOI Listing
February 2021

Enriched feeds with iodine and selenium from natural and sustainable sources to modulate farmed gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fillets elemental nutritional value.

Food Chem Toxicol 2020 Jun 14;140:111330. Epub 2020 Apr 14.

Aquaculture, Valorization and Bioprospective Division (DivAV). Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere, I.P. (IPMA), Lisbon, Portugal; Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR), Porto University, Porto, Portugal. Electronic address:

Developing tailor-made fortified farmed fish is a promising solution to overcome nutritional deficiencies and increase consumer confidence in these products. This study evaluated the supplementation of three fortified diets with I-rich seaweed and selenised-yeast on essential and toxic elements levels in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Fortified diets resulted in increased I, Se and Fe in fish muscle. Biofortified seabream and carp revealed lower Cu and Br. The reduction of fishmeal and fish oil in fortified diets resulted in lower Hg and Cd in seabream muscle. Contrarily, fortified diets increased As and Hg in carp fillets. The consumption of 150 g of fortified seabream enabled a significantly higher contribution to the daily recommended intake (DRI) of I (10%) and Se (76%) than non-fortified fish, whereas fortified carp fulfilled 23% of I DRI and 91% of Se DRI. Moreover, the exposure to Pb decreased with the consumption of biofortified seabream (23-82% BMDL) and carp (26-92% BMDL). These results support the strategy of developing eco-innovative biofortified farmed fish using sustainable, natural, safe and high-quality ingredients in feeds, to enable consumers to overcome nutritional deficiencies without significantly increased feed costs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2020.111330DOI Listing
June 2020