Publications by authors named "A S Nawfar"

2 Publications

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Immediate Revascularization of A Traumatic Limb Vascular Injury associated with Major Pelvic Injuries.

Malays Orthop J 2015 Nov;9(3):61-64

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Malaysia.

High velocity pelvic injury with limb vascular injury poses difficulties as immediate surgery for limb reperfusion is indicated. However immediate vascular intervention deviates from conventional principles of damage control following major injuries. We present two cases of this rare combination of injuries. In both cases, early limb revascularization is possible despite presented with multiple injuries and pelvic fracture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5704/MOJ.1511.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5393139PMC
November 2015

The outcomes of salvage surgery for vascular injury in the extremities: a special consideration for delayed revascularization.

Malays Orthop J 2014 Mar;8(1):14-20

Department of Orthopaedics, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Malaysia.

Abstract: A seven years retrospective study was performed in 45 consecutive vascular injuries in the extremities to investigate the pattern of injuries, managements and outcomes. Motor-vehicle accidents were the leading cause of injuries (80%), followed by industrial injuries (11.1%) and iatrogenic injuries (4.4%). Popliteal and brachial artery injuries were commonly involved (20%). Fifteen (33.3%) patients had fractures, dislocation or fracture dislocation around the knee joint and 6 (13.3%) patients had soft tissue injuries without fracture. Traumatic arterial transection accounted for 34 (75.6%) cases, followed by laceration in 7 (15.6%) and 9 (6.7%) contusions. Associated nerve injuries were seen in 8 (17.8 %) patients using intra-operative findings as the gold standard, both conventional angiogram (CA) and computerized tomography angiogram (CTA) had 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity in determining the site of arterial injuries. The mean ischemic time was 25.31 hours (4 - 278 hours). Thirty-three (73.3 %) patients were treated more than 6 hours after injury and 6 patients underwent revascularization after 24 hours; all had good collateral circulation without distal pulses or evidence of ischemic neurological deficit. The mean ischemic time in 39 patients who underwent revascularization within 24 hours was 13.2 hours. Delayed amputation was performed in 5 patients (11.1%). Of the 6 patients who underwent delayed revascularization, one patient had early amputation, one -had delayed amputation following infection and multiple flap procedures while the rest of the patients' limbs survived. Joint stiffness was noted in 10 patients (22.2%) involving the knee joint, elbow and shoulder in two patients each. Infection was also noted in 5 patients (11.1%) with two of them were due to infected implants. Other complications encountered included nonunion (2 patients, 4.4%), delayed union (1 patient, 2.2%),limb length discrepancy (1 patient, 2.2%), hematoma (1 patient, 2.2%) and leaking anastomosis in one patient (2.2%). Volkmann's ischemic contracture occurred in 3 (6.7%) patients. There was no complication noted in 8 (17.8%) patients Three patients (6.7%) died of whom two were not due to vascular causes. We conclude that early detection and revascularization of traumatic vascular injuries is important but delayed revascularization also produced acceptable results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5704/MOJ.1403.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4093557PMC
March 2014
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