Publications by authors named "A Pires-Luis"

38 Publications

Molecular Genetic Features of Primary Nonurachal Enteric-type Adenocarcinoma, Urachal Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous Adenocarcinoma, and Intestinal Metaplasia/Adenoma: Review of the Literature and Next-generation Sequencing Study.

Adv Anat Pathol 2020 Sep;27(5):303-310

Departments of Pathology.

The diagnosis of primary adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder may be challenging in routine practice. These tumors may morphologically and immunohistochemically overlap with urachal adenocarcinoma and colorectal adenocarcinoma. Further, their genetic background is poorly understood. We systematically searched the PubMed database for results of complex genetic evaluation of primary bladder adenocarcinoma subtypes. Subsequently, we designed our own series of bladder lesions. We evaluated 36 cases: 16 primary enteric-type adenocarcinomas, 7 urachal enteric adenocarcinomas, 3 primary mucinous/colloid adenocarcinomas, and 10 intestinal-type metaplasia/villous adenoma. Detailed clinical data were collected, and all cases were examined using targeted next-generation sequencing. On the basis of the literature, the first mutated gene in these tumors was reported to be KRAS in 11.3% of cases, followed by TERT promoter mutations in 28.5%. In addition to KRAS and TERT, other genes were also found to be frequently mutated in primary bladder adenocarcinoma, including TP53, PIK3CA, CTNNB1, APC, FBXW7, IDH2, and RB1. In our series, the most frequent gene mutations in primary enteric-type adenocarcinomas were as follows: TP53 (56%); BRCA2, KMT2B (both 33%); NOTCH2, KDR, ARID1B, POLE, PTEN, KRAS (all 28%); in urachal enteric adenocarcinoma they were as follows: TP53 (86%); PTEN, NOTCH (both 43%); in primary mucinous/colloid adenocarcinomas they were as follows: KRAS, GRIN2A, AURKB (all 67%); and, in intestinal-type metaplasia/villous adenoma, they were as follows: APC, PRKDC (both 60%); ROS1, ATM, KMT2D (all 50%). No specific mutational pattern was identified using cluster analysis for any of the groups. Herein, we describe the pathologic features and immunohistochemical staining patterns traditionally used in the differential diagnoses of glandular lesions of the bladder in routine surgical pathology. We outline the mutational landscape of these lesions as an aggregate of published data with additional data from our cohort. Although diagnostically not discriminatory, we document that the most common genetic alterations shared between these glandular neoplasms include TP53, APC (in the Wnt pathway), and KRAS (in the MAPK pathway) mutations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PAP.0000000000000268DOI Listing
September 2020

Stereological study of organelle distribution in human oocytes at metaphase I.

Zygote 2020 Aug 14;28(4):308-317. Epub 2020 Apr 14.

Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Microscopy, Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar (ICBAS), University of Porto (UP), Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313Porto, Portugal.

We have previously presented a stereological analysis of organelle distribution in human prophase I oocytes. In the present study, using a similar stereological approach, we quantified the distribution of organelles in human metaphase I (MI) oocytes also retrieved after ovarian stimulation. Five MI oocytes were processed for transmission electron microscopy and a classical manual stereological technique based on point-counting with an adequate stereological grid was used. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests with Bonferroni correction were used to compare the means of relative volumes (Vv) occupied by organelles. In all oocyte regions, the most abundant organelles were mitochondria and smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) elements. No significant differences were observed in Vv of mitochondria, dictyosomes, lysosomes, or SER small and medium vesicles, tubular aggregates and tubules. Significant differences were observed in other organelle distributions: cortical vesicles presented a higher Vv (P = 0.004) in the cortex than in the subcortex (0.96% vs 0.1%) or inner cytoplasm (0.96% vs 0.1%), vesicles with dense granular contents had a higher Vv (P = 0.005) in the cortex than in the subcortex (0.1% vs 0%), and SER large vesicles exhibited a higher Vv (P = 0.011) in the inner cytoplasm than in the subcortex (0.2% vs 0%). Future stereological analysis of metaphase II oocytes and a combined quantitative data of mature and immature oocytes, will enable a better understanding of oocyte organelle distribution during in vivo maturation. Combined with molecular approaches, this may help improve stimulation protocols and in vitro maturation methods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0967199420000131DOI Listing
August 2020

Hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe renal cell tumor: An integrated genetic and epigenetic characterization of a case.

Exp Mol Pathol 2018 12 18;105(3):352-356. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

Department of Pathology, Portuguese Oncology Institute of Porto, Portugal; Cancer Biology & Epigenetics Group, Research Center, Portuguese Oncology Institute of Porto, Portugal; Department of Pathology and Molecular Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar (ICBAS), University of Porto, Portugal. Electronic address:

Introduction: Hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumor (HOCT) is a renal cell neoplasm displaying overlapping cellular and architectural features of both renal oncocytoma (RO) and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC). It has been described in the context of oncocytosis, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, and also sporadically. Thus far, HOCT immunohischemical profile and cytogenetic alterations have been reported, but not epigenetic alterations. Herein, we characterize a HOCT case, including microRNA expression, comparing it to sporadic RO and chRCC.

Methods: An HOCT was entirely submitted. Representative paraffin blocks were selected for histochemical, immunohistochemical and FISH analyses. MicroRNAs were extracted from the two components separately and selected microRNA expression was performed.

Results: This 4 cm HOCT, from a 69 year-old female, was composed mainly by oncocytic cells with an insular distribution (RO-like) and areas of larger clarified cells (chRCC-like). The two areas displayed different features: RO-like areas showed negative colloidal iron staining, multifocal CD15, negative CK7, focal multiple tetrasomies, and higher miR21 expression; chRCC-like areas showed colloidal iron diffuse staining with moderate intensity, focal CD15 and CK7, no numeric chromosomic alterations, and higher miR141 and miR200b expression.

Conclusion: microRNA expression in the two HOCT components is similar to its sporadic tumors counterparts. Morphologic, immunohistochemical, cytogenetic and epigenetic data on this case suggest either two independent pathogenic pathways or an early pathogenic divergence for RO-like and chRCC-like components of HOCT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yexmp.2018.10.008DOI Listing
December 2018

Correction to: Abstracts : 29th European Congress of Pathology.

Virchows Arch 2018 02;472(2):303

Department of Pathology, IPO - Porto, Portugal.

In Poster Sessions, the first-author name was missing from the authorship group originally listed for Abstract PS-13-001 (page S176), entitled "Gastric carcinoma with lymphoid stroma: Analysis of microsatellite instability and Epstein-Barr virus status". The correct authorship group is shown above.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00428-017-2254-4DOI Listing
February 2018

Correction to: Abstracts : 29th European Congress of Pathology.

Virchows Arch 2018 02;472(2):299

Department of Pathology, IPO-Porto, Portugal.

In Poster Sessions, the first-author name was missing from the authorship group originally listed for Abstract PS-01-004 (page S52), entitled "Clinicopathological features of microinvasive breast cancer". The correct authorship group is shown above.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00428-017-2252-6DOI Listing
February 2018