Publications by authors named "A Noelle Larson"

1,182 Publications

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Duramycin radiosensitization of MCA-RH 7777 hepatoma cells through the elevation of reactive oxygen species.

J Cancer Res Ther 2021 Apr-Jun;17(2):543-546

Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Objective: The objective of this study is to explore the radiosensitization effects of duramycin against the liver cancer hepatoma cells and relationship to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation.

Materials And Methods: MCA-RH 7777 cells were treated with various combinations of duramycin concentrations and radiation doses. After the treatment, cell viabilities were determined by a cell proliferation assay; intracellular ROS levels were detected with the flow cytometric method.

Results: MCA-RH 7777 cell viability was found significantly reduced after combining duramycin and radiation exposure (comparing to that of either treatment alone). Increased intracellular ROS levels were observed in cells treated with combinations of duramycin and radiation.

Conclusion: Duramycin increased the intracellular ROS generation and also increased the radiosensitivity of MCA-RH 7777 cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_284_18DOI Listing
June 2021

Understanding Health Need and Services Received by Youth in Foster Care in Community Safety-Net Health Centers in Oregon.

J Health Care Poor Underserved 2021 ;32(2):783-798

Youth in foster care have significant unmet health needs. We assessed health needs and health service use among youth in foster care in Oregon using electronic health record data from 258 community health centers and Medicaid enrollment data from 2014-2016. We identified 2,140 youth in foster care and a matched comparison group of 6,304 youth from the same clinics who were not in foster care, and compared the groups on demographic characteristics, health needs, and health service use. Youth in foster care were significantly more likely to have at least one chronic health condition, at least one mental health condition, and at least one mental health service compared with controls. Youth in foster care were significantly less likely to have a primary care visit. Despite significant mental health needs among youth in foster care, few received mental health care; this lack was greater among African American and Hispanic youth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/hpu.2021.0105DOI Listing
January 2021

Minimally-invasive tubular retraction ports for intracranial neurosurgery: History and future perspectives.

J Clin Neurosci 2021 Jul 6;89:97-102. Epub 2021 May 6.

University of Minnesota Medical School Department of Neurosurgery, United States.

Brain retraction is a necessary yet potentially damaging requirement of accessing lesions located in deep structures. The development of minimally-invasive tubular retractors (MITRs) provides the theoretical advantage of maximizing visualization of and access to deep-seated lesions, all while minimizing collateral tissue damage. These advantages make MITRs preferable to traditional bladed retractors in the majority of deep-seated lesions. Several commercially-available MITR systems currently exist and have been shown to aid in achieving excellent outcomes with acceptable safety profiles. Nevertheless, important drawbacks to currently-available MITR systems exist. Continued pursuit of an ideal MITR system that provides maximal visualization and access to deep-seated lesions while minimizing retraction-related tissue damage is therefore important. In this review, we discuss the historical development of MITRs, the advantages of MITRs compared to traditional bladed retractors, and opportunities to improve the development of prospective MITRs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2021.04.035DOI Listing
July 2021

Trends in Incidence of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: A Modern US Population-based Study.

J Pediatr Orthop 2021 Jul;41(6):327-332

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Background: A successful disease screening strategy requires a high incidence of the condition, efficacy of early treatment, and efficient detection. There is limited population-based data describing trends in incidence of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) in the United States and potential role of school screening programs on the incidence of AIS. Thus, we sought to evaluate the incidence of AIS over a 20-year period between 1994 and 2013 using a population-based cohort.

Methods: The study population comprised 1782 adolescents (aged 10 to 18 y) with AIS first diagnosed between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2013. The complete medical records and radiographs were reviewed to confirm diagnosis and coronal Cobb angles at first diagnosis. Age-specific and sex-specific incidence rates were calculated and adjusted to the 2010 United States population. Poisson regression analyses were performed to examine incidence trends by age, sex, and calendar period.

Results: The overall age-adjusted and sex-adjusted annual incidence of AIS was 522.5 [95% confidence interval (CI): 498.2, 546.8] per 100,000 person-years. Incidence was about 2-fold higher in females than in males (732.3 vs. 338.8/100,000, P<0.05). The incidence of newly diagnosed AIS cases with radiographs showing a Cobb angle >10 degrees was 181.7 (95% CI: 167.5, 196.0) per 100,000 person-years. The overall incidence of AIS decreased significantly after discontinuation of school screening in 2004 (P<0.001). The incidence of bracing and surgery at initial diagnosis was 16.6 (95% CI: 12.3, 20.9) and 2.0 (95% CI: 0.5, 3.4) per 100,000 person-years, respectively.

Conclusions: Overall population-based incidence of AIS decreased after school screening was discontinued. However, incidence of patients with a Cobb angle >10 degrees, initiation of bracing and surgery did not change significantly over time. This provides further data to help determine the role of scoliosis screening.

Level Of Evidence: Level III.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BPO.0000000000001808DOI Listing
July 2021