Publications by authors named "A Kpozèhouen"

32 Publications

Effect of wearing a helmet on the occurrence of head injuries in motorcycle riders in Benin: a case-control study.

Inj Epidemiol 2021 May 10;8(1):17. Epub 2021 May 10.

Ecole de Santé Publique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles, Belgium.

Background: In Benin, motorcycles are the main means of transport for road users and are involved in more than half of crashes. This study aims to determine the effect of wearing a helmet on reducing head injuries in road crashes in Benin.

Methods: This case-control study took place in 2020 and focused on road trauma victims. The sample, consisting of 242 cases (trauma victims with head injuries) for 484 controls (without head injuries), was drawn from a database of traffic crash victims recruited from five hospitals across the country from July 2019 to January 2020. Four groups of independent variables were studied: socio-demographic and economic variables, history, behavioural variables including helmet use and road-related and environmental variables. To assess the shape of the association between the independent variables and the dependent variable, a descending step-by-step binary logistic regression model was performed using an explanatory approach.

Results: Fewer of the subjects with a head injury were wearing a helmet at the time of the crash 69.8% (95% CI = 63.6-75.6) compared to those without a head injury 90.3% (95% CI = 87.3-92.8). Adjusting for the other variables, subjects not wearing helmets were at greater risk of head injuries (OR = 3.8, 95% CI (2.5-5.7)); the head injury rating was 1.9 (95% CI = 1.2-3.3) times higher in subjects who were fatigued during the crash than among those who were not and 2.0 (95% CI = 1.2-3.3) times higher in subjects with no medical history.

Conclusion: Failure to wear a helmet exposes motorcyclists to the risk of head injuries during crashes. It is important to increase awareness and better target such initiatives at the subjects most at risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40621-021-00311-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8108325PMC
May 2021

Prevalence and Factors Associated With Surgical Site Infections in the University Clinics of Traumatology and Urology of the National University Hospital Centre Hubert Koutoukou Maga in Cotonou.

Front Public Health 2021 10;9:629351. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

University Clinic for Traumatology-Orthopedics and Reconstructive Surgery, Centre National University Hospitalier Hubert Koutoukou Maga, Cotonou, Benin.

Study the prevalence and factors associated with the occurrence of surgical site infections in University Clinics of Trauma-Orthopedics, Reconstructive Surgery and Urology in a developing country. This was a retrospective descriptive and analytical study of 384 people operated on during the period of 2019. Logistic regression was used to study the factors associated with surgical site infections. The associations between the dependent variable and the other variables were assessed by the odds ratio (OR) followed by their 95% confidence interval. The prevalence of surgical site infections was 7.81% CI 95% = (5.12-10.51). The factors linked to the surgical site infections in the studied population were the patient's admission method [OR = 2.74; 95% CI = (1.08-6.95)] and the length of the postoperative stay [OR = 8.75; 95% CI = (2.83-26.98)]. The interview and direct observation identified health care system dysfunctions, medical errors, patient monitoring and financial unavailability as factors that could favor the onset of surgical site infections. Interventions should be focused on the factors identified for the effective management of operated patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2021.629351DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7902708PMC
February 2021

Implementation of a model of awareness-raising for taxi motorcyclists in Benin in relation to helmet use: protocol for a quasi-experimental study.

BMC Public Health 2021 01 28;21(1):241. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Ecole de Santé Publique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.

Background: In the large cities of Benin, motorcycle taxi drivers, mainly between the ages of 20 and 40, are particularly exposed to accidents due to their profession. User awareness, along with legislative reforms and enforcement measures, would reduce the incidence of crashes and injuries. This study aims to test the effectiveness of an awareness-raising model regarding helmet use for motorcycle taxi drivers.

Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study that will take place in the cities of Parakou (intervention group) and Porto Novo (control group). Over a three-month period, a package of awareness-raising activities will be implemented in the intervention area, targeting a group of motorcycle taxi drivers. The messages to be developed for awareness-raising will focus on the most frequently influencing factors, as identified by the baseline collection. These key messages will be disseminated through various tools and communication channels (banners, motorcycle stickers and motorcycle taxi uniforms, interactive sessions). Data will be collected prospectively via a self-reported questionnaire and observation, carried out before the intervention, at the end, and 6 months later. The data will relate to knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding helmet use. The analysis will compare the indicators between the groups, as well as between the pre- and post-intervention phase. The KoboCollect software will be used for data entry and processing, and Stata 15 will be used for data analysis. Chi-square or Fisher, Student's or Kruskal-Wallis tests will be used for the comparisons. The difference-in-difference method will be used to determine the specific effect of the awareness activities.

Discussion: This study will assess the contribution of awareness messages to changing the behaviour of motorcycle taxi drivers by determining the specific effect of the intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-10298-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7842175PMC
January 2021

"My right to walk, my right to live": pedestrian fatalities, roads and environmental features in Benin.

BMC Public Health 2021 01 19;21(1):162. Epub 2021 Jan 19.

Public Health School (Université Libre de Bruxelles) - Center for Research in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Clinical Research, Brussels, Belgium.

Background: The implementation of road safety interventions in many developing countries usually focuses on the behavior of users. In order to draw more attention on the role of road infrastructure and physical environment in road safety interventions, this study aims to analyze the environmental and road factors associated with the pedestrians involved in traffic crashes in Benin.

Method: The method used was an analysis of national road crash statistics for the period 2008 to 2015. The information available included the circumstances surrounding the collision, the road infrastructure, the vehicles and the individuals involved. A multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors of pedestrian mortality in traffic crashes.

Results: During the period studied, 3760 crashes involved at least one pedestrian. The death rate among these pedestrians was 27.74% (CI 95%: 26.31-29.20). The mortality predictors were the area in which the crash occurred (OR = 4.94; CI 95%: 4.10-5.94), the day of the crash (OR = 2.17; CI 95%:1.34-3.52), light levels (OR = 1.30; CI 95%: 1.06-1.59), road classification (OR = 1.79; CI 95%: 1.46-2.20), the condition of the road surface (2.04, CI 95%: 1.41-2.95) and the position of the pedestrian during the crash (OR = 1.69; CI 95%: 1.19-2.38).

Conclusions: These results support the need for a holistic approach to interventions aiming to tackle deaths on roads. Interventions should integrate environmental factors for greater pedestrian safety around roads with appropriate signs, roads in good condition and awareness campaigns for a proper use of road infrastructures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-10192-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7816405PMC
January 2021

Can Professional Motorcyclists Be an Asset in the Immediate Post-Crash Care System in Benin? Baseline of Knowledge and Practices in the City of Cotonou (Benin).

Open Access Emerg Med 2021 6;13:1-11. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Health Policies and Systems Department, Regional Institute of Public Health, Ouidah, Benin.

Purpose: The situation of road crashes-related deaths remains problematic in low-income countries. The present study aims at analyzing the first-aid knowledge and practices of professional motorcyclists (PMs) in the city of Cotonou in Benin.

Materials And Methods: This is a cross-sectional analytical study conducted from 25 March to 19 April 2019 in Cotonou and concerned PMs registered in a fleet who gave their consent to participate in the study. The World Health Organization's two-stage adaptive cluster sampling technique was applied to select the eligible PMs while respecting the proportionality rate per fleet. A logistic regression analysis was done and the odds ratios were estimated with 95% confidence interval.

Results: The 430 PMs surveyed were all middle-aged men with an average age of 38.38 (±8.70). Among them, 62.56% knew at least one of the emergency phone numbers for the ambulance, police or fire services and 49.53% of the PMs knew at least one of the 3 techniques evaluated. In addition, 33.23% of PMs who had witnessed at least an RC stated that they had alerted the emergency services, and 32.27% said they had helped the victims. The main reason given for the lack of initiative in RCs was lack of knowledge of the course of action to take (19.64%). The level of knowledge was associated with the level of education (AOR: 3.11; CI 95%: 1.79-5.43) and with the length of experience (AOR: 2.56; CI 95%: 1.58-4.18).

Conclusion: This study reveals that the level of knowledge and practice of PMs in the field of first aid in Cotonou is low and demonstrates the relevance and the need to include this target group in the first-aid chain for road crashes in Benin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S267828DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7797346PMC
January 2021