Publications by authors named "A Farhath Fathima"

22 Publications

Novel device to contain aerosols during phacoemulsification.

Indian J Ophthalmol 2021 Jun;69(6):1605-1608

Department of Glaucoma, Aravind Eye Hospital, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India.

We herein describe a novel device to contain droplets and aerosols during phacoemulsification. We modified the silicon phaco test chamber into an aerosol containment chamber (ACC) by shortening the chamber and making a pear-shaped opening at one aspect of its tip. The ACC was fitted over phaco tip such that 4-5 mm of phaco tip and sleeve was exposed. When the phaco tip and irrigation port are inside the anterior chamber during phacoemulsification, the portion of the modified chamber remains around the clear corneal tunnel in an enclosing manner that contains aerosols and droplets.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijo.IJO_3478_20DOI Listing
June 2021

Emergence of antimicrobial resistance and magnitude of Unani medicine - scope and challenges.

J Complement Integr Med 2021 Jan 29. Epub 2021 Jan 29.

Central Council for Research in Unani Medicine, Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India, New Delhi, India.

Emergence of antimicrobial resistance, with practically all newly developed and even more potent antibiotics like carbapenem and colistin, has become a matter of great public health concern. A number of common diseases of public health importance are becoming harder and sometimes impossible to treat due to increased resistance of pathogens. These alarming threats seek prime attention of scientific community to develop newer antibiotics with long-lasting efficacy, least side effects, and low economic burden. Unani classical texts have enormous citations on different infectious diseases. Many single drugs and compound formulations are in vogue since ages for the treatment of infectious diseases. Use of Afaviya (spices), Mufarrehat (exhilarants), Tiryaqi Advia (drugs with antidote properties) and Sirka (vinegar) is highly advocated in treating various infectious diseases. Though, enormous research activities have been undertaken worldwide to explore and develop newer antibiotics from natural resources, indicating massive magnitude of natural products in treating various infectious diseases, however, the higher plants, still largely seems to be unexplored. Moreover, elaborated and well controlled clinical studies are still lacking to authenticate their clinical significance. Hence, a rigorous, well-designed & well-structured research is highly paramount to ascertain the provision of newer, relatively safe and cost effective natural antibiotics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jcim-2020-0092DOI Listing
January 2021

Acute comitant esotropia in a very young child due to combined mechanism: A case report.

Indian J Ophthalmol 2020 Nov;68(11):2610-2612

Department of Paediatric Ophthalmology, Aravind Eye Hospital, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India.

We report a case of esotropia with high hyperopia in a 3-year-old female child. She was initially treated with hyperopic correction and noted to have residual esotropia, which was diagnosed as partial accommodative esotropia. Later when she presented with headache, she was diagnosed to have an intracranial tumour. To our surprise, after neurosurgical excision of tumour, her non-accommodative component of the esotropia resolved over 1 year implying that the intracranial lesion was an additional causative factor for this acute onset Accommodative esotropia. The child attained Orthophoria with the same hyperopic correction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijo.IJO_344_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7774155PMC
November 2020

Chromium-catechin complex, synthesis and toxicity check using bacterial models.

Heliyon 2020 Aug 6;6(8):e04563. Epub 2020 Aug 6.

Chemical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) - Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India.

Chromium-catechin complex was synthesized by reacting [Cr(HO)] (hexa-aqua) with catechin as a ligand. Toxicity studies were carried out for the complex using bacterial models for safer application of this complex in the future as a drug. Chromium-catechin complex was characterized using ESI Mass spectrometry, electronic spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The complex was found mildly inhibitory towards with the mode of action being oxidative damage, targeting cell membrane. The complex was supportive towards , which was evident from the growth profile and inhibition studies. SEM analysis supported the results of membrane integrity studies, where the bacterial liposomes upon treatment with the complex revealed slight morphological changes in the case of , without any change in the case of . The toxicity studies on chromium-catechin complex using bacterial model saves time, as well as resources by providing quick and reliable results, which could ease up the work to be done in future with higher group of organisms like animal model. Therefore, in the future, this complex can be used as an antidiabetic drug after performing toxicity studies with animal model.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e04563DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7415841PMC
August 2020

In-silico therapeutic investigations of arjunic acid and arjungenin as an FXR agonist and validation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

Comput Biol Chem 2020 Feb 15;84:107163. Epub 2019 Nov 15.

Nutrition, Biochemistry and Toxicology Division, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Mysuru, 570011, India.

The present study was to illustrate the agonistic property of arjungenin and arjunic acid towards farnesoid X receptor protein (FXR).The pharmacokinetic properties like molecular interactions, absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicity (ADMET) of the ligands were checked through in-silico studies. Protein-ligand docking was carried out using autodock software. Molecular docking analysis confirmed strong binding energy and interaction of arjungenin and arjunic acid with the target protein and the ADMET profiles identified for both compounds were promising.Further in vitro studies were performed in 3T3-L1 adipocyte to verify the agonistic property of arjungenin and arjunic acid. Oil red O staining was done to check differentiation induction. Adiponectin, leptin, triglycerides and total cholesterol levels were quantified. The mRNA expression of FXR, Cyp7a1, PPAR-γ and SREBP-1c were quantified using fluorescent real-time PCR. Cytotoxicity assay was confirmed that up to 150 μM concentration there is no significant cell death on treatment with arjunic acid and arjungenin. Treatment with arjungenin and arjunic acid confirms increased differentiation of the cells with significant (P < 0.05) increase in adiponectin (118.07% and 132.92%) and leptin (133.52% and 149.74%) protein levels compared to the negative control group. After treatment with arjungenin and arjunic acid in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes the mRNA expression of FXR, PPAR-γ and SREBP-1c were significantly (P < 0.01) increased and cyp7a1 was significantly (P < 0.01) decreased when compared with the negative control group. Overall, our results suggest that arjungenin and arjunic acid acts as an FXR agonist and may be useful for rational therapeutic strategies as a novel drug to treat cholesterol mediated metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compbiolchem.2019.107163DOI Listing
February 2020
-->