Publications by authors named "A C Barolet"

30 Publications

Light-induced nitric oxide release in the skin beyond UVA and blue light: Red & near-infrared wavelengths.

Nitric Oxide 2021 Sep 16;117:16-25. Epub 2021 Sep 16.

Division of Dermatology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; RoseLab Skin Optics Research Laboratory, Laval, Quebec, Canada.

Nitric oxide (NO) is omnipresent in the body and synthesized by 3 isoenzymes (nNOS, eNOS and iNOS), all detected in human skin. NO can be stored in a pool of compounds readily converted to NO following skin irradiation by UVR and blue light. This non-enzymatic (without NOS involvement) photolytic reaction mobilizes cutaneous stores of NO derivatives to the bloodstream, lowering blood pressure. However, with the likelihood of skin deleterious effects caused by UVR/blue light, safer wavelengths in the red/near-infrared (NIR) spectrum are becoming potential contenders to release cutaneous NO, possibly via NOS temperature-dependent effects. The use of red/NIR light to mobilize NO stores from the body's largest organ (the skin) is auspicious. This review focuses on UVR, blue, red, and NIR spectra and their capacity to release NO in human skin. PubMed and Google Scholar were used as article databases to find relevant publications related to this particular field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.niox.2021.09.003DOI Listing
September 2021

The COVID-19 Pandemic and Coronary Angiography for ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction, Use of Mechanical Support, and Mechanical Complications in Canada: A Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology National Survey.

CJC Open 2021 Sep 12;3(9):1125-1131. Epub 2021 May 12.

Division of Cardiology, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

Background: As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic first wave, reductions in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) invasive care, ranging from 23% to 76%, have been reported from various countries. Whether this change had any impact on coronary angiography (CA) volume or on mechanical support device use for STEMI and post-STEMI mechanical complications in Canada is unknown.

Methods: We administered a Canada-wide survey to all cardiac catheterization laboratory directors, seeking the volume of CA use for STEMI performed during the period from March 1 2020 to May 31, 2020 (pandemic period), and during 2 control periods (March 1, 2019 to May 31, 2019 and March 1, 2018 to May 31, 2018). The number of left ventricular support devices used, as well as the number of ventricular septal defects and papillary muscle rupture cases diagnosed, was also recorded. We also assessed whether the number of COVID-19 cases recorded in each province was associated with STEMI-related CA volume.

Results: A total of 41 of 42 Canadian catheterization laboratories (98%) provided data. There was a modest but statistically significant 16% reduction (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.84; 95% confidence interval 0.80-0.87) in CA for STEMI during the first wave of the pandemic, compared to control periods. IRR was not associated with provincial COVID-19 caseload. We observed a 26% reduction (IRR 0.74; 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.89) in the use of intra-aortic balloon pump use for STEMI. Use of an Impella pump and mechanical complications from STEMI were exceedingly rare.

Conclusions: We observed a modest 16% decrease in use of CA for STEMI during the pandemic first wave in Canada, lower than the level reported in other countries. Provincial COVID-19 caseload did not influence this reduction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cjco.2021.04.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8114614PMC
September 2021

The Efficacy and Effectiveness of Non-ablative Light-Based Devices in Hidradenitis Suppurativa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Front Med (Lausanne) 2020 3;7:591580. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

Division of Dermatology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that may be treated with non-ablative light-based devices; however, no systematic reviews on the topic exist to date. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine efficacy of non-ablative light-based devices in treating HS. Specifically, a systematic review was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and CINAHL. We analyzed the use of non-ablative light-based devices in the treatment of HS. At least two investigators performed title/abstract review and data extraction. Meta-analysis was conducted using comprehensive meta-analysis software. 5 RCTs and 11 case reports/series were included ( = 211 unique patients). No observational studies were found. For Nd:YAG laser, meta-analysis of 3 RCTs reported improvement in modified HS Lesion Area and Severity Index (HS-LASI) when compared to control subjects. In addition, three case reports/series reported HS-LASI, Physician Global Assessment (PGA) scores and number-of-lesion improvements in treated patients. For intense pulsed light (IPL), two RCTs reported HS-LASI and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score improvements. For Alexandrite laser, one case report showed lesion improvement. In conclusion, meta-analysis of Nd:YAG laser in HS patients suggests significant improvement in HS-LASI scores. For IPL, evidence is limited, but suggests improvement in HS-LASI and DLQI scores. For Alexandrite laser, evidence precludes conclusions. Given small sample sizes and inconsistent reporting scales, larger RCTs are required to better determine the efficacy of these modalities in treating HS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2020.591580DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7670045PMC
November 2020

Beneficial Effects of Near-Infrared Light Photobiomodulation in Linear Morphea: A Case Report.

Photobiomodul Photomed Laser Surg 2020 Nov 27;38(11):679-682. Epub 2020 Oct 27.

Division of Dermatology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada.

Linear morphea is a variant of scleroderma limited to the skin and underlying tissues secondary to an autoimmune inflammation leading to excess collagen deposition and fibrosis. Apart from topical or oral medications, successful light-based treatments have been reported using phototherapy including Psoralen plus ultraviolet A, photodynamic therapy, carbon dioxide laser, pulsed dye laser, and visible/infrared light. We report a patient with biopsy-proven infraorbital linear morphea responding to 940 nm near-infrared light photobiomodulation treatments. The patient had excellent cosmesis without textural changes or hypopigmentation despite her darker skin complexion (Fitzpatrick phototype III) after tri-weekly treatments for 8 months. Linear morphea, therefore, may be potentially amenable to home use light-based therapy by using nonthermal nonablative 940 nm photons. To our knowledge, this home-based treatment approach has not been previously reported.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/photob.2020.4840DOI Listing
November 2020

Myocardial infarction with a combined ST-segment elevation in anterior and inferior leads: the left anterior descending artery does not have to be a "wrap-around" vessel to be a culprit.

Kardiol Pol 2020 10 24;78(10):1062-1063. Epub 2020 Jul 24.

Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, Division of Cardiology, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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http://dx.doi.org/10.33963/KP.15527DOI Listing
October 2020
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