Publications by authors named "A Badhey"

26 Publications

The Role of a Social Media-Based Surgical Education Platform: "OtoNotes".

Laryngoscope 2021 May 20. Epub 2021 May 20.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lary.29607DOI Listing
May 2021

Management of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans.

Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2021 May 14. Epub 2021 May 14.

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

Purpose: Provide an up to date review of the diagnosis, workup and treatment of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP). DFSP can be a challenging disease to manage and adequate understanding of the most up to date literature can help provide comprehensive treatment strategies.

Recent Findings: DFSP is an infiltrative cutaneous sarcoma. It tends to have deep local invasion with a high risk of local recurrence, but a low risk of distant metastasis. It presents typically as a slow growing, asymptomatic skin lesion. It presents rarely in the head and neck, only 15% of the time. Recent data has discussed the role of wide local excision (WLE) vs. Mohs surgery. In addition, for unresectable disease the role of systemic therapy and immunomodulatory agents such as Imatinib has shown success.

Summary: Typically, surgical management is the first line for DFSP, however the risk for local recurrence still remains high with negative margins. Due to this risk, lifelong surveillance is required after initial diagnosis and management. Similar to other head and neck tumors, most recurrences happen within the first 3 years after treatment. DFSP can be treated with WLE or Mohs. For aggressive disease that is considered unresectable systemic therapy does exist, including molecular targeted therapies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MOO.0000000000000721DOI Listing
May 2021

Surgical Techniques for Head and Neck Reconstruction in the Vessel-Depleted Neck.

Facial Plast Surg 2020 Dec 24;36(6):746-752. Epub 2020 Dec 24.

Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio.

The vessel-depleted neck presents a unique and challenging scenario for reconstructive surgery of the head and neck. Prior surgery and radiation often result in significant scarring and damage to the neck vasculature, making identification of suitable recipient vessels for microvascular free tissue transfer exceedingly difficult. Therefore, alternative reconstructive techniques and/or vessel options must be considered to obtain a successful reconstructive outcome for a patient. In this article, we discuss our experience and approach to the management of the vessel-depleted neck, emphasizing the importance of preoperative planning and having multiple backup options prior to surgery. The various preoperative imaging modalities and available options for recipient arteries and veins are presented in detail. Additionally, we discuss modifications of select free flaps to maximize their utility in successful reconstruction. Together with thoughtful preoperative planning, these techniques can help aid the reconstructive surgeon in addressing the complex decisions associated with the vessel-depleted neck.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1721108DOI Listing
December 2020

Absent Posterior Belly of Digastric Muscle.

Laryngoscope 2021 07 10;131(7):1501-1502. Epub 2020 Dec 10.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.

Objective: Report a unique case of absent posterior belly of digastric muscle, with a literature review and discussion of its clinical importance.

Methods: Present a case report and review the current literature including PUBMED search terms; "absent posterior digastric", "digastric muscle", "posterior belly".

Results: While there were multiple reports of accessory anterior and posterior bellies and absence of anterior belly, there is a paucity of literature on absence of posterior belly of digastric muscle.

Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of an absent posterior belly of the digastric muscle. The posterior belly of the digastric muscle is an important landmark in neck dissection, and its absence makes knowledge of other anatomic landmarks critically important. Laryngoscope, 131:1501-1502, 2021.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lary.29317DOI Listing
July 2021

If Not Us, Who? And If Not Now, When?: Perspective From a COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit Run by Otolaryngology Residents.

JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2020 11;146(11):997-998

Department of Otolaryngology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaoto.2020.3232DOI Listing
November 2020