Publications by authors named "A B Balmuk"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Myxoma complicated acute intestinal obstruction: A rare case with diagnostic challenges.

Niger J Clin Pract 2021 Feb;24(2):292-294

School of Medicine-Medical School Student, Acibadem Mehmet Ali Aydınlar University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Myxomas are slowly growing mesenchymal tumors and are considered as extremely rare benign tumors of small intestine. This is the case of a young woman presenting with acute bowel obstruction due to ileo-ileal intussusception caused by an intraluminal 4- cm solitary nodule, found to be a myxoma upon pathologic examination, after resection by surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/njcp.njcp_676_19DOI Listing
February 2021

Risk of symptomatic radiation necrosis in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases.

Neurocirugia (Astur) 2020 Oct 17. Epub 2020 Oct 17.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Acibadem Mehmet Ali Aydinlar University, School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.

Introductio: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a treatment option in the initial management of patients with brain metastases. While its efficacy has been demonstrated in several prior studies, treatment-related complications, particularly symptomatic radiation necrosis (RN), remains as an obstacle for wider implementation of this treatment modality. We thus examined risk factors associated with the development of symptomatic RN in patients treated with SRS for brain metastases.

Patients And Methods: We performed a retrospective review of our institutional database to identify patients with brain metastases treated with SRS. Diagnosis of symptomatic RN was determined by appearance on serial MRIs, MR spectroscopy, requirement of therapy, and the development of new neurological complaints without evidence of disease progression.

Results: We identified 323 brain metastases treated with SRS in 170 patients from 2009 to 2018. Thirteen patients (4%) experienced symptomatic RN after treatment of 23 (7%) lesions. After SRS, the median time to symptomatic RN was 8.3 months. Patients with symptomatic RN had a larger mean target volume (p<0.0001), and thus larger V100% (p<0.0001), V50% (p<0.0001), V12Gy (p<0.0001), and V10Gy (p=0.0002), compared to the rest of the cohort. Single-fraction treatment (p=0.0025) and diabetes (p=0.019) were also significantly associated with symptomatic RN.

Conclusion: SRS is an effective treatment option for patients with brain metastases; however, a subset of patients may develop symptomatic RN. We found that patients with larger tumor size, larger plan V100%, V50%, V12Gy, or V10Gy, who received single-fraction SRS, or who had diabetes were all at higher risk of symptomatic RN.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neucir.2020.08.009DOI Listing
October 2020

Management of symptomatic radiation necrosis after stereotactic radiosurgery and clinical factors for treatment response.

Radiat Oncol J 2020 Sep 14;38(3):176-180. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Institute of Health Sciences, Mehmet Ali Aydinlar Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Purpose: Approximately 10% of patients who received brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) develop symptomatic radiation necrosis (RN). We sought to determine the effectiveness of treatment options for symptomatic RN, based on patient-reported outcomes.

Materials And Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 217 patients with 414 brain metastases treated with SRS from 2009 to 2018 at our institution. Symptomatic RN was determined by appearance on serial magnetic resonance images (MRIs), MR spectroscopy, requirement of therapy, and development of new neurological complaints without evidence of disease progression. Therapeutic interventions for symptomatic RN included corticosteroids, bevacizumab and/or surgical resection. Patient-reported therapeutic outcomes were graded as complete response (CR), partial response (PR), and no response.

Results: Twenty-six patients experienced symptomatic RN after treatment of 50 separate lesions. The mean prescription dose was 22 Gy (range, 15 to 30 Gy) in 1 to 5 fractions (median, 1 fraction). Of the 12 patients managed with corticosteroids, 6 patients (50%) reported CR and 4 patients (33%) PR. Of the 6 patients managed with bevacizumab, 3 patients (50%) reported CR and 1 patient (18%) PR. Of the 8 patients treated with surgical resection, all reported CR (100%). Other than surgical resection, age ≥54 years (median, 54 years; range, 35 to 81 years) was associated with CR (odds ratio = 8.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-15.39; p = 0.027).

Conclusion: Corticosteroids and bevacizumab are commonly utilized treatment modalities with excellent response rate. Our results suggest that patient's age is associated with response rate and could help guide treatment decisions for unresectable symptomatic RN.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3857/roj.2020.00171DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7533401PMC
September 2020

Evaluation of response to stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with radioresistant brain metastases.

Radiat Oncol J 2019 Dec 31;37(4):265-270. Epub 2019 Dec 31.

Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Mehmet Ali Aydinlar Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and melanoma have been considered 'radioresistant' due to the fact that they do not respond to conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) provides high-dose radiation to a defined target volume and a limited number of studies have suggested the potential effectiveness of SRS in radioresistant histologies. We sought to determine the effectiveness of SRS for the treatment of patients with radioresistant brain metastases.

Materials And Methods: We performed a retrospective review of our institutional database to identify patients with RCC or melanoma brain metastases treated with SRS. Treatment response were determined in accordance with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors.

Results: We identified 53 radioresistant brain metastases (28% RCC and 72% melanoma) treated in 18 patients. The mean target volume and coverage was 6.2 ± 9.5 mL and 95.5% ± 2.9%, respectively. The mean prescription dose was 20 ± 4.9 Gy. Forty lesions (75%) demonstrated a complete/partial response and 13 lesions (24%) with progressive/stable disease. Smaller target volume (p < 0.001), larger SRS dose (p < 0.001), and coverage (p = 0.008) were found to be positive predictors of complete response to SRS.

Conclusion: SRS is an effective management option with up to 75% response rate for radioresistant brain metastases. Tumor volume and radiation dose are predictors of response and can be used to guide the decision-making for patients with radioresistant brain metastases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3857/roj.2019.00409DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6952719PMC
December 2019