Publications by authors named "A A Jackson"

4,185 Publications

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Reply to G. Gui et al.

J Clin Oncol 2021 May 5:JCO2100603. Epub 2021 May 5.

Charles Craddock, MD, Centre for Clinical Haematology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom; Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom; Aimee Jackson, BSc, Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom; and Sylvie D. Freeman, MD, DPhil, Institute of Immunology and Immunotherapy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.21.00603DOI Listing
May 2021

Connecting With Trauma Patients After Discharge: A Phone Call Follow-Up Study.

J Trauma Nurs 2021 May-Jun 01;28(3):179-185

Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: Traumatic injury is sudden and unexpected. It may lead to long-standing physical and physiological consequences. Approximately 10% of the world's disease burden is attributable to traumatic injuries. At the commencement of the study, there was limited information regarding civilian trauma patients' recovery following discharge from the hospital. There are several reasons for this including lack of available resources for follow-up by clinical staff and often trauma patients have multiple injuries, which can result in fragmented care. This limits the ability to assess a patient's recovery following discharge from the hospital.

Objective: This phone call follow-up study was conducted to assess the number of trauma patients who may be showing symptoms of physical and psychological distress after traumatic injury.

Methods: The study was carried out in New South Wales (Australia) Metropolitan major (Level 1) trauma center. Consented patients were contacted at 72 hr, 1 month, and 3 months after discharge from the hospital.

Results: Many patients at all time points had difficulty coping with activities of daily living from pain (183 patients [64%], 121 patients [43%], and 58 patients [23%]), fatigue and sleep disturbance (110 patients [38%], 79 patients [28%], and 49 patients [20%]), as well as anxiety and frustration (38 patients [13%], 79 patients [28%], and 98 patients [39%]) regarding their recovery and returning to their preinjury activities.

Conclusion: The research indicates that some trauma patients do not recover quickly physically or emotionally. These patients require identification and appropriate management of the consequences of trauma to enable them to return to their preinjury quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000580DOI Listing
May 2021

An Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cardiac Rehabilitation program delivered in a non-Indigenous health service (Yeddung Gauar): a mixed methods feasibility study.

BMC Cardiovasc Disord 2021 May 1;21(1):222. Epub 2021 May 1.

Nursing, Midwifery and Public Health, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT, Australia.

Background: There is limited evidence of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people attending cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs despite high levels of heart disease. One key enabler for CR attendance is a culturally safe program. This study evaluates improving access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to attend a CR program in a non-Indigenous health service, alongside improving health workforce cultural safety.

Methods: An 18-week mixed-methods feasibility study was conducted, with weekly flexible CR sessions delivered by a multidisciplinary team and an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Worker (AHW) at a university health centre. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who were at risk of, or had experienced, a cardiac event were recruited. Data was collected from participants at baseline, and at every sixth-session attended, including measures of disease risk, quality-of-life, exercise capacity and anxiety and depression. Cultural awareness training was provided for health professionals before the program commenced. Assessment of health professionals' cultural awareness pre- and post-program was evaluated using a questionnaire (n = 18). Qualitative data from participants (n = 3), the AHW, health professionals (n = 4) and referrers (n = 4) was collected at the end of the program using yarning methodology and analysed thematically using Charmaz's constant comparative approach.

Results: Eight referrals were received for the CR program and four Aboriginal women attended the program, aged from 24 to 68 years. Adherence to the weekly sessions ranged from 65 to 100%. At the program's conclusion, there was a significant change in health professionals' perception of social policies implemented to 'improve' Aboriginal people, and self-reported changes in health professionals' behaviours and skills. Themes were identified for recruitment, participants, health professionals and program delivery, with cultural safety enveloping all areas. Trust was a major theme for recruitment and adherence of participants. The AHW was a key enabler of cultural authenticity, and the flexibility of the program contributed greatly to participant perceptions of cultural safety. Barriers for attendance were not unique to this population.

Conclusion: The flexible CR program in a non-Indigenous service provided a culturally safe environment for Aboriginal women but referrals were low. Importantly, the combination of cultural awareness training and participation in the program delivery improved health professionals' confidence in working with Aboriginal people.

Trial Registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) 12618000581268, http://www.ANZCTR.org.au/ACTRN12618000581268.aspx , registered 16 April 2018.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12872-021-02016-3DOI Listing
May 2021

Current Landscape of Nutrition Within Prehabilitation Oncology Research: A Scoping Review.

Front Nutr 2021 9;8:644723. Epub 2021 Apr 9.

National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.

Prehabilitation aims to improve functional capacity prior to cancer treatment to achieve better psychosocial and clinical outcomes. Prehabilitation interventions vary considerably in design and delivery. In order to identify gaps in knowledge and facilitate the design of future studies, we undertook a scoping review of prehabilitation studies to map the range of work on prehabilitation being carried out in any cancer type and with a particular focus on diet or nutrition interventions. Firstly, to describe the type of prehabilitation programs currently being conducted. Secondly, to describe the extent to which prehabilitation studies involved aspects of nutrition, including assessment, interventions, implementation, and outcomes. Any study of quantitative or qualitative design that employed a formal prehabilitation program before cancer treatment ("prehabilitation" listed in keywords, title, or abstract). Search was conducted in July 2020 using MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, EMCARE, CINAHL, and AMED. Quantitative data were reported as frequencies. Qualitative nutrition data were charted using a framework analysis that reflects the Nutrition Care Process Model: assessment, intervention, and monitoring/evaluation of the nutrition intervention. Five hundred fifty unique articles were identified: 110 studies met inclusion criteria of a formal prehabilitation study in oncology. prehabilitation studies were mostly cohort studies (41%) or randomized-controlled trials (38%) of multimodal (49%), or exercise-only (44%) interventions that were applied before surgery (94%). Nutrition assessment was inconsistently applied across these studies, and often conducted without validated tools (46%). Of the 110 studies, 37 (34%) included a nutrition treatment component. Half of these studies provided the goal for the nutrition component of their prehabilitation program; of these goals, less than half referenced accepted nutrition guidelines in surgery or oncology. Nutrition interventions largely consisted of counseling with dietary supplementation. The nutrition intervention was indiscernible in 24% of studies. Two-thirds of studies did not monitor the nutrition intervention nor evaluate nutrition outcomes. Prehabilitation literature lacks standardized and validated nutritional assessment, is frequently conducted without evidence-based nutrition interventions, and is typically implemented without monitoring the nutrition intervention or evaluating the intervention's contribution to outcomes. We suggest that the development of a core outcome set could improve the quality of the studies, enable pooling of evidence, and address some of the research gaps identified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2021.644723DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8062858PMC
April 2021

Identification and Expression of Pathogenicity Genes in f. sp. .

Front Microbiol 2021 9;12:593140. Epub 2021 Apr 9.

School of Life Sciences, Warwick Crop Centre, University of Warwick, Wellesbourne Campus, Warwick, United Kingdom.

is a soilborne fungal plant pathogen responsible for causing disease in many economically important crops with "special forms" () adapted to infect specific plant hosts. f. sp. (FOP) is the causal agent of Fusarium wilt disease of pea. It has been reported in every country where peas are grown commercially. Disease is generally controlled using resistant cultivars possessing single major gene resistance and therefore there is a constant risk of breakdown. The main aim of this work was to characterise isolates collected from diseased peas in the United Kingdom as well as FOP isolates obtained from other researchers representing different races through sequencing of a housekeeping gene and the presence of () genes, which have previously been associated with pathogenicity in other f. spp. isolates from diseased United Kingdom pea plants possessed none or just one or two known genes with no consistent pattern of presence/absence, leading to the conclusion that they were foot-rot causing isolates rather than FOP. In contrast, FOP isolates had different complements of genes with all those identified as race 1 containing , , , , , , , and . FOP isolates that were identified as belonging to race 2 through testing on differential pea cultivars, contained either , , , or , . Significant upregulation of genes was also observed over the early stages of infection by different FOP races in pea roots. Race specific gene profiling may therefore provide potential targets for molecular identification of FOP races but further research is needed to determine whether variation in complement of genes in FOP race 2 isolates results in differences in virulence across a broader set of pea differential cultivars.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2021.593140DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8062729PMC
April 2021