Publications by authors named "Özge Çeliker Tosun"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Adaptation, validity and reliability of geriatric self-efficacy index for urinary incontinence (GSE-UI) in geriatric incontinents.

Int Urol Nephrol 2021 May 3;53(5):825-834. Epub 2021 Jan 3.

Buca Maternity and Child Hospital, Izmir, Turkey.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the GSE-UI for use with a Turkish population and to determine its validity and reliability.

Methods: 120 elderly with UI aged 60 and over years (mean 72.89 ± 9.59 years) participated in this study. An interview was held to determine the type, severity and frequency if any, incontinence. Then, the Mini-Mental State Examination, IIQ-7, UDI-6 and I-QOL questionnaires were administered to the participants. After translating the tool to Turkish, test and retest was performed with an interval of 7-14 days.

Results: The internal consistency of the first test of the GSE-UI-Turkish was excellent, with a Cronbach α of 0.95. The test-retest reliability of the GSE-UI-Turkish was found to be excellent (ICC = 0.94, 95% CI 0.92-0.96). The correlation coefficient between the GSE-UI-Turkish and the UDI-6, IIQ-7, I-QOL were found to be good to excellent (r = 0.68, r = 0.67, r = 0.81, r = 0.45, respectively; p < 0.0001).

Conclusion: Results of our study GSE-UI of Turkish version, self-efficacy evaluation in geriatric incontinence was a valid and reliable survey that can be used in clinical practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11255-020-02721-6DOI Listing
May 2021

Pelvic floor muscle function and symptoms of dysfunctions in midwifes and nurses of reproductive age with and without pelvic floor dysfunction.

Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol 2019 Jul;58(4):505-513

School of Physiotherapy, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey. Electronic address:

Objectives: This study aims to compare pelvic floor muscle (PFM) functions in midwifes and nurses of reproductive age with and without pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) and investigate the relationship between PFM function and the number, type and symptoms of PFDs.

Materials And Methods: 82 midwifes and nurses of reproductive age with (n = 51) and without PFD (n = 31) participated in the study. PFM function was assessed by digital palpation using PERFECT scale. Gynecological examination, ultrasonography, disease-specific questionnaires, questions and tests were used to assess symptoms of PFD. PFD was assessed in terms of risk factors, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse (POP), pelvic pain and sexual dysfunctions.

Results: Power parameter of PERFECT scheme was significantly lower in subjects with PFD compared to Non-PFD group (p = 0.002). 41% of the subjects with Power 5 PFM strength in PFD group were diagnosed as stage 1 POP, 5.8% as stage 2 POP, 15.7% of urge incontinence, 23.3% of stress incontinence and 10.5% of mixed incontinence. Both urinary incontinence and POP were detected in 15.7% of them. Among all subjects, incontinence symptoms decreased whereas POP and sexual function did not change as PFM increased. PFM strength was negatively correlated with the number of PFD (p = 0.002, r = -0.34). The type of dysfunction did not correlate with PFM strength (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: PFM strength only affects of urinary incontinence sypmtoms among all PFDs in midwifes and nurses of reproductive age. PFM strength may not be the main factor in the occurrence of PFDs as pelvic floor does not consist solely of muscle structure. However, it strongly affects the number of dysfunctions. Therefore, PFM training should be performed to prevent the occurrence of extra dysfunctions in addition to the existing ones even if it does not alter the symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tjog.2019.05.014DOI Listing
July 2019

Is grand multiparity a risk factor for the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis?

Clin Interv Aging 2018 29;13:505-508. Epub 2018 Mar 29.

School of Physiotherapy, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey.

Objective: In this study, we investigated the relationship between the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis and parity.

Materials And Methods: The retrospective study included 129 postmenopausal women who were divided into three groups depending on the number of parity: Group I, <5; Group II, 5-9; and Group III, ≥10. The mean age of the subjects was 57.71±5.02 years.

Results: No significant difference was found among the three groups regarding body mass index values, duration of menopause, mean thyroid stimulating hormone values and frequency of diabetes. Among the three groups, no significant difference was found in terms of the frequency of lumbar osteoporosis (>0.05), whereas a significant difference was found regarding the frequency of femoral osteoporosis (=0.012; <0.05).

Conclusion: It was revealed that femoral bone mineral density significantly decreased as the number of parity increased.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S155793DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5880179PMC
August 2018

Assessment of the effect of pelvic floor exercises on pelvic floor muscle strength using ultrasonography in patients with urinary incontinence: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

J Phys Ther Sci 2016 Jan 29;28(2):360-5. Epub 2016 Feb 29.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ege Faculty, University of Medicine, Turkey.

[Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the effect of pelvic floor exercises on pelvic floor muscle strength could be detected via ultrasonography in patients with urinary incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] Of 282 incontinent patients, 116 participated in the study and were randomly divided into a pelvic floor muscle training (n=65) group or control group (n=51). The pelvic floor muscle training group was given pelvic floor exercise training for 12 weeks. Both groups were evaluated at the beginning of the study and after 12 weeks. Abdominal ultrasonography measurements in transverse and longitudinal planes, the PERFECT scheme, perineometric evaluation, the stop test, the stress test, and the pad test were used to assess pelvic floor muscle strength in all cases. [Results] After training, the PERFECT, perineometry and transabdominal ultrasonography measurements were found to be significantly improved, and the stop test and pad test results were significantly decreased in the pelvic floor muscle training group, whereas no difference was observed in the control group. There was a positive correlation between the PERFECT force measurement scale and ultrasonography force measurement scale before and after the intervention in the control and pelvic floor muscle training groups (r=0.632 and r=0.642, respectively). [Conclusion] Ultrasonography can be used as a noninvasive method to identify the change in pelvic floor muscle strength with exercise training.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1589/jpts.28.360DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4792974PMC
January 2016

The Turkish version of the pregnancy physical activity questionnaire: cross-cultural adaptation, reliability, and validity.

J Phys Ther Sci 2015 Oct 30;27(10):3215-21. Epub 2015 Oct 30.

School of Physiotherapy, Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey.

[Purpose] The aim of this study was to translate the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire, adapt it for use with Turkish subjects and determine its reliability and validity. [Subjects and Methods] The Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire was translated into Turkish and administered twice at 7-14-day intervals to pregnant women to assess the test-retest reliability. Cronbach's α was used for internal consistency, and the inter-rater correlation coefficient was used to calculate the test-retest reliability. The Turkish Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire were used to estimate validity. [Results] The internal consistency during the first and third trimesters of pregnancy was excellent, with Cronbach's α values of 0.93 and 0.95, respectively. The mean interval between the two assessments was 11.1 ± 2.1 days. The correlation coefficient between the total activity measured by the Turkish version of the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire estimates of the total metabolic equivalent were fair to poor during the first, second, and third trimesters of pregnancy (r = 0.17, r = 0.17, r = 0.21, respectively). The Turkish version of the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire showed fair correlations with the Short Form 36 Health Survey physical component score (r = -0.30) and mental component score (r = -0.37) for the first trimester of pregnancy. [Conclusion] The Turkish version of the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire was found to be reliable and valid for assessing a pregnant woman's physical activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1589/jpts.27.3215DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4668169PMC
October 2015

Do stages of menopause affect the outcomes of pelvic floor muscle training?

Menopause 2015 Feb;22(2):175-84

From the 1School of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey; 2Division of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tepecık Education and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey; and 5School of Physiotherapy, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey.

Objective: The purpose of our study is to determine whether there is a difference in pelvic floor muscle strength attributable to pelvic floor muscle training conducted during different stages of menopause.

Methods: One hundred twenty-two women with stress urinary incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence were included in this prospective controlled study. The participants included in this study were separated into three groups according to the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop staging system as follows: group 1 (n = 41): stages -3 and -2; group 2 (n = 32): stages +1 and -1; and group 3 (n = 30): stage +2. All three groups were provided an individual home exercise program throughout the 12-week study. Pelvic floor muscle strength before and after the 12-week treatment was measured in all participants (using the PERFECT [power, endurance, number of repetitions, and number of fast (1-s) contractions; every contraction is timed] scheme, perineometry, transabdominal ultrasound, Brink scale, pad test, and stop test). Data were analyzed using analysis of variance.

Results: There were no statistically significant differences in pre-exercise training pelvic floor muscle strength parameters among the three groups. After 12 weeks, there were statistically significant increases in PERFECT scheme, Brink scale, perineometry, and ultrasound values. In contrast, there were significant decreases in stop test and 1-hour pad test values observed in the three groups (P = 0.001, dependent t test). In comparison with the other groups, group 1 demonstrated statistically significant improvements in the following postexercise training parameters: power, repetition, speed, Brink vertical displacement, and stop test. The lowest increase was observed in group 2 (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Strength increase can be achieved at all stages of menopause with pelvic floor muscle training, but the rates of increase vary according to the menopausal stage of the participants. Women in the late menopausal transition and early menopause are least responsive to pelvic floor muscle strength training. Further studies in this field are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GME.0000000000000278DOI Listing
February 2015